USA Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

USA Chat

Free Chat Rooms App

Welcome to the forum of USA Chat Club where you can find Free forums for the US and Free online chat rooms for the United States and guests if you just scroll down or click here: CHAT ROOMS. No registration needed to start chatting now!

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Alabama

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16
1
John Merrill joins GOP race to unseat Doug Jones in Senate

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill is joining a growing field of Republican primary candidates competing for a chance to unseat Democratic Sen. Doug Jones next year. Merrill announced his candidacy Tuesday in a press conference at the Alabama Capitol. He said Alabama needs a “proven conservative” in the Senate seat who will support President [...]


The post John Merrill joins GOP race to unseat Doug Jones in Senate appeared first on Alabama Today.




Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill is joining a growing field of Republican primary candidates competing for a chance to unseat Democratic Sen. Doug Jones next year.


Merrill announced his candidacy Tuesday in a press conference at the Alabama Capitol.


He said Alabama needs a “proven conservative” in the Senate seat who will support President Donald Trump on immigration, judicial appointments and other issues.


With 100 supporters standing behind him, Merrill said Jones would be better suited to representing New York or California.


The 55-year-old Republican is a former member of the Alabama Legislature.
Also running in the GOP primary are former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville, legislator Arnold Mooney and businessman Stanley Adair.


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press. 


The post John Merrill joins GOP race to unseat Doug Jones in Senate appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: John Merrill joins GOP race to unseat Doug Jones in Senate

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

2
Alabama / Bradley Byrne: Religious Freedom is Worth Defending
« on: June 26, 2019, 10:00:19 PM »
Bradley Byrne: Religious Freedom is Worth Defending

Last week the Supreme Court ruled on an important case with significant implications for the future of religious expression in our republic. The case, American Legion v. American Humanist Association, was brought by a nonprofit atheist organization seeking to remove an almost 100-year-old monument in Maryland’s Prince George’s County. The 40-foot granite and cement cross, [...]


The post Bradley Byrne: Religious Freedom is Worth Defending appeared first on Alabama Today.




Last week the Supreme Court ruled on an important case with significant implications for the future of religious expression in our republic.


The case, American Legion v. American Humanist Association, was brought by a nonprofit atheist organization seeking to remove an almost 100-year-old monument in Maryland’s Prince George’s County.


The 40-foot granite and cement cross, called the Bladensburg Peace Cross, was built on public land and paid for by local families, businesses and the American Legion in 1925. It has stood in memory of local residents who died in World War I for almost a century. A state commission now owns the land and pays for its upkeep.


On its face, the claims made by the American Humanist Association that the Bladensburg Peace Cross represents an unconstitutional endorsement of religion do not seem legitimate or offered in good faith.


While the cross unquestionably has origins as a Christian symbol, for centuries it has also represented memorialization, remembrance and respect for the dead at cemeteries, parks and public spaces around the world.


Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump’s first choice for the Supreme Court in 2017, wrote that he would have dismissed the case, saying that the challenger’s claim to be offended by the sight of the monument did not hold legal merit.


But the Court chose to issue a ruling and rejected the out-of-state organization’s legal arguments that the memorial cross located just outside of Washington, DC represented an endorsement of religion that violated our Constitution. In a 7 to 2 decision, the Court ruled that the cross may continue to stand on public land.


Justice Samuel Alito, recognizing that a court-ordered removal of the cross would be the true violation of the Constitution, wrote in the main opinion that “tearing down monuments with religious symbolism and scrubbing away any reference to the divine will strike many as aggressively hostile to religion.


“…[D]estroying or defacing the Cross that has stood undisturbed for nearly a century would not be neutral and would not further the ideals of respect and tolerance embodied in the First Amendment.”


The Court’s decision was met with cheer and relief in Prince George’s County where the Bladensburg Peace Cross enjoys broad support.


The ruling “ensures that this memorial — a dignified tribute to those who came before us and made the ultimate sacrifice — will stand tall and proud for the ages,” Republican Governor Larry Hogan said.


Thankfully, we live in a country of religious freedom where no one is forced to practice religion but can practice any religion they choose. That is one of our most fundamental freedoms as Americans.


What cases like these are truly about is undermining religion. Lawsuit-happy groups like the American Humanist Association and the Freedom From Religion Foundation seek to advance their own agenda by making it more difficult for Christians and believers of other religions to publicly practice and share their faith.


With the rise of these lawsuits, it is more important than ever that we place jurists on our courts who will adhere to our Constitution and protect our religious liberties.


Regrettably, these attacks on religious freedom are taking place in Congress too. Last month, Democrats passed the so-called Equality Act which included an explicit carveout of Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) protections. It was only a few decades ago that Democrats Chuck Schumer and Ted Kennedy shepherded this legislation through Congress, but times and the Democrats have changed.


Just this week, the Committee on Education and Labor, on which I sit, has focused its attention on the “misapplication” of RFRA. I see this for what it is: an attempt to undermine our religious freedoms.


Our Constitutional protections are worth defending, and I pledge to continue the fight.


Congressman Bradley Byrne is currently serving his fourth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, was born and raised in Mobile. 


The post Bradley Byrne: Religious Freedom is Worth Defending appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Bradley Byrne: Religious Freedom is Worth Defending

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

3
2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions in Kay Ivey’s office

Both the Business Council of Alabama and the Executive Office of Kay Ivey are experiencing relatively new leadership under the helms of Katie Britt and former Congressman Jo Bonner respectively. Britt joined the BCA in Dec. of last year and Bonner joined Ivey just a week earlier in Nov. though didn’t take his current role as Chief [...]


The post 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions in Kay Ivey’s office appeared first on Alabama Today.




Both the Business Council of Alabama and the Executive Office of Kay Ivey are experiencing relatively new leadership under the helms of Katie Britt and former Congressman Jo Bonner respectively. Britt joined the BCA in Dec. of last year and Bonner joined Ivey just a week earlier in Nov. though didn’t take his current role as Chief of Staff formally until Jan.


They both made it through their first legislative session marking it with big wins such as the passage of the Gas Tax and other critical economic development bills. Now that session is over, it makes sense changes to their teams would be inevitable as they both seek experienced and driven staff. 


To that end, today Kay Ivey announced that she has hired Nathan Lindsay as her new director of appointments. According to his LinkedIn account, Lindsay has worked for the BCA for 8 years. Prior to that he worked for Governor Bob Reily.


“Nathan brings to our team a wealth of knowledge that I know will serve the state well,” Governor Ivey said in a statement. “In addition to his expertise and insight, Nathan is a man of character. The men and women of my staff must have a strong work ethic, a depth of knowledge and a heart for public service. Nathan certainly embodies all of these characteristics.”


This is the second personnel notice in the month of June for Ivey’s office and the second senior staffer coming directly from the BCA.


On June 11th the governor announced that Leah Garner would be her new Communications Director. Garner took over for Daniel Sparkman, who’s wife currently works at the BCA. According to her LinkedIn Sparkman and Garner worked together in Governor Robert Bentley’s communications office. 


According to the release issued by Ivey’s office, Garner served as the Director of Governmental Affairs and Advocacy for the BCA before taking on the communications role. 


Ivey also highlighted Garner’s time as a middle school social studies teacher in Tuscaloosa. 


“Leah will be a strong addition to my Administration, and I am confident she will effectively lead the Communications Office,” Governor Ivey said. “From her time as a teacher to her wide range of experience in state government, Leah has a unique perspective and a true heart for service.”


 


The post 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions in Kay Ivey’s office appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions in Kay Ivey’s office

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

4
2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions Kay Ivey’s office

Both the Business Council of Alabama and the Executive Office of Kay Ivey are experiencing relatively new leadership under the helms of Katie Britt and former Congressman Jo Bonner respectively. Britt joined the BCA in Dec. of last year and Bonner joined Ivey just a week earlier in Nov. though didn’t take his current role as Chief [...]


The post 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions Kay Ivey’s office appeared first on Alabama Today.




Both the Business Council of Alabama and the Executive Office of Kay Ivey are experiencing relatively new leadership under the helms of Katie Britt and former Congressman Jo Bonner respectively. Britt joined the BCA in Dec. of last year and Bonner joined Ivey just a week earlier in Nov. though didn’t take his current role as Chief of Staff formally until Jan.


They both made it through their first legislative session marking it with big wins such as the passage of the Gas Tax and other critical economic development bills. Now that session is over, it makes sense changes to their teams would be inevitable as they both seek experienced and driven staff. 


To that end, today Kay Ivey announced that she has hired Nathan Lindsay as her new director of appointments. According to his LinkedIn account, Lindsay has worked for the BCA for 8 years. Prior to that he worked for Governor Bob Reily.


“Nathan brings to our team a wealth of knowledge that I know will serve the state well,” Governor Ivey said in a statement. “In addition to his expertise and insight, Nathan is a man of character. The men and women of my staff must have a strong work ethic, a depth of knowledge and a heart for public service. Nathan certainly embodies all of these characteristics.”


This is the second personnel notice in the month of June for Ivey’s office and the second senior staffer coming directly from the BCA.


On June 11th the governor announced that Leah Garner would be her new Communications Director. Garner took over for Daniel Sparkman, who’s wife currently works at the BCA. According to her LinkedIn Sparkman and Garner worked together in Governor Robert Bentley’s communications office. 


According to the release issued by Ivey’s office, Garner served as the Director of Governmental Affairs and Advocacy for the BCA before taking on the communications role. 


Ivey also highlighted Garner’s time as a middle school social studies teacher in Tuscaloosa. 


“Leah will be a strong addition to my Administration, and I am confident she will effectively lead the Communications Office,” Governor Ivey said. “From her time as a teacher to her wide range of experience in state government, Leah has a unique perspective and a true heart for service.”


 


The post 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions Kay Ivey’s office appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: 2 weeks and 2 senior staffers depart BCA for key positions Kay Ivey’s office

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

5
Alabama / Census, redistricting top remaining Supreme Court cases
« on: June 26, 2019, 04:19:55 AM »
Census, redistricting top remaining Supreme Court cases

The Supreme Court enters its final week of decisions with two politically charged issues unresolved, whether to rein in political line-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Both decisions could affect the distribution of political power for the next decade, and both also may test Chief Justice John Roberts’ [...]


The post Census, redistricting top remaining Supreme Court cases appeared first on Alabama Today.




The Supreme Court enters its final week of decisions with two politically charged issues unresolved, whether to rein in political line-drawing for partisan gain and allow a citizenship question on the 2020 census.


Both decisions could affect the distribution of political power for the next decade, and both also may test Chief Justice John Roberts’ professed desire to keep his court of five conservatives appointed by Republican presidents and four liberals appointed by Democrats from looking like the other, elected branches of government. Decisions that break along the court’s political and ideological divide are more likely to generate criticism of the court as yet another political institution.


In addition, the justices could say as early as Monday whether they will add to their election-year calendar a test of President Donald Trump’s effort to end an Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation. The court’s new term begins in October.


Twelve cases that were argued between November and April remain to be decided. They include disputes over: a trademark sought by the FUCT clothing line, control of a large swatch of eastern Oklahoma that once belonged to Indian tribes and when courts should defer to decisions made by executive branch agencies.


But the biggest cases by far involve the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the census and two cases in which lower courts found that Republicans in North Carolina and Democrats in Maryland went too far in drawing congressional districts to benefit their party at the expense of the other party’s voters.


The Supreme Court has never invalidated districts on partisan grounds, but the court has kept the door open to these claims. The court has struck down districts predominantly based on race.


Now though the justices are considering whether to rule out federal lawsuits making claims of partisan gerrymandering. Conversely, the court also could impose limits on the practice for the first time. It was not clear at arguments in March that any conservative justices were prepared to join the liberals to limit partisan gerrymandering.


In the census case, the Census Bureau’s own experts say that Hispanics and other immigrants are likely to be undercounted if the census questionnaire asks everyone about their citizenship status. The last time the question appeared on the once-a-decade census was in 1950, and even then it wasn’t asked of everyone.


Democratic-led states and cities, and civil rights groups challenging the citizenship case, have argued that the question would take power away from cities and other places with large immigrant populations and reward less populated rural areas. They have more recently pointed to newly discovered evidence on the computer files of a now-dead Republican consultant that they say shows the citizenship question is part of a broader plan to increase Republican power. The administration has said the new allegations lack merit.


When the case was argued in April, it appeared that the conservative justices were poised to allow the question to be asked.


Census results determine how seats in the House of Representatives are allocated among the 50 states and how billions of dollars in federal money is distributed. The population count also forms the basis for the redrawing of districts from Congress to local governments that takes place every 10 years.


The court’s decisions in the redistricting cases will affect the tools state lawmakers can use to draw those districts, especially in states in which one party controls the governor’s office and both houses of the state legislature.


Republican successes in the 2010 election cycle left them completely in charge of the process in such states as Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin. In all four states, Democratic voters sued over congressional or legislative districts, and federal courts determined that the districts violated those voters’ constitutional rights.


Democrats controlled the process in Maryland, where they successfully reshaped one district to pry it from longtime Republican control.


Once the court’s work is done for the summer, the justices typically leave town to teach and travel. Justice Brett Kavanaugh will teach a course on the origins of the U.S. Constitution for George Mason University’s summer program in England, near where the Magna Carta was sealed 800 years ago.


By Mark Sherman Associated Press


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press.


The post Census, redistricting top remaining Supreme Court cases appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Census, redistricting top remaining Supreme Court cases

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

6
Donald Trump: ‘Surprise’ question about Pence led him to hesitate

President Donald Trump says he hesitated to back a possible 2024 presidential run by Vice President Mike Pence because he was caught off-guard by the question. Given a chance at a do-over, however, Trump still did not endorse his loyal lieutenant. “You can’t put me in that position,” Trump said June 14 when a host [...]


The post Donald Trump: ‘Surprise’ question about Pence led him to hesitate appeared first on Alabama Today.




President Donald Trump says he hesitated to back a possible 2024 presidential run by Vice President Mike Pence because he was caught off-guard by the question. Given a chance at a do-over, however, Trump still did not endorse his loyal lieutenant.


“You can’t put me in that position,” Trump said June 14 when a host of Fox News Channel’s “Fox and Friends” asked him about endorsing Pence should the vice president seek to succeed Trump in 2024. Pence hasn’t explicitly said he’ll run in 2024, but is widely expected to.


Offered a chance to explain, Trump told NBC News he hesitated “because it was a surprise question.”


“I’m not even thinking of it. It’s so far out. I mean, It’s so far out,” Trump told “Meet the Press” in a wide-ranging interview taped Friday and broadcast Sunday. “Now what happens in 2024? I don’t know that Mike is going to run. I don’t know who’s running or anything else.”


Also in the interview, Trump criticized Fed chairman Jerome Powell and said his biggest mistake was choosing Jeff Sessions to be attorney general.
For his part, Pence glossed over the flap Trump’s comments caused, telling CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday that Trump’s comment reflected “the fact that the only election he and I are focused on is 2020.” Trump formally announced his 2020 reelection bid last week with Pence at his side.


In the NBC interview, Trump lashed out at Powell over past interest rate hikes and denied threatening to demote him to the Fed’s No. 2 job.


The Federal Reserve voted last week to leave its key interest rate unchanged, but the independent agency also signaled that it is prepared to begin cutting rates to protect the U.S. economy from trade conflicts and other threats.


Trump did not answer directly last week when he was questioned about news reports that the White House in February had explored whether Trump had the authority to demote Powell. Trump denied to NBC that such a threat has been issued.


“I have the right to do that. But I haven’t said that,” the president said.
Trump has previously explored firing Powell, who, by law, can only be fired for cause.


The interview was airing locally Sunday as Trump arrived at his golf club in Sterling, Virginia, by helicopter from the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland, where he spent part of the weekend.


Trump also returned to the White House on the helicopter instead of by motorcade, his usual means of transportation to and from the club.


White House officials did not respond to requests for comment on the change in the president’s mode of travel.


By Darlene Superville Associated Press


Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press.


The post Donald Trump: ‘Surprise’ question about Pence led him to hesitate appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Donald Trump: ‘Surprise’ question about Pence led him to hesitate

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

7
The Latest: Donald Trump says he’s in ‘no hurry’ to strike Iran

The latest on The United States and Iran’s tensions over the shoot-down of a massive U.S. drone (all times local): 8:10 p.m. President Donald Trump says he abruptly called off the military strikes on Iran Thursday because the likely deaths of 150 Iranians would have been out of proportion to the shootdown of an unmanned [...]


The post The Latest: Donald Trump says he’s in ‘no hurry’ to strike Iran appeared first on Alabama Today.




The latest on The United States and Iran’s tensions over the shoot-down of a massive U.S. drone (all times local):


8:10 p.m.


President Donald Trump says he abruptly called off the military strikes on Iran Thursday because the likely deaths of 150 Iranians would have been out of proportion to the shootdown of an unmanned American surveillance drone.


He is also indicating he still hopes for talks with Iranian leaders rather than any escalation of military conflict.


Trump says he is “in no hurry,” adding that increasingly severe sanctions meant to push Iran to the nuclear negotiating table are “biting” the Iranian economy.


Iran, though, is showing no public inclination to negotiate. It is unclear whether Trump, who says the U.S. military had been “cocked and loaded” to hit Iran, is considering new military options.

4:15 p.m.


U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says Iran’s financial sector will soon face penalties if it doesn’t work to stop evading international guidelines designed to combat money laundering.


Mnuchin says Iran has not taken steps to comply with the guidelines. As a result, he says, branches and subsidiaries of financial institutions based in Iran will be subjected to increased oversight.


Mnuchin spoke Friday in Orlando, Florida, at a meeting of the Financial Action Task Force. That is a global organization started in 1989 that works to stop money laundering, financing of militant networks and other threats to the integrity of the international financial system.


The task force says Iran has until October to make progress toward compliance before additional counter-measures will be taken.


2 p.m.


The U.N. says Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ message to the United States and Iran is to avoid anything that would escalate the current tense situation and “to have nerves of steel.”


U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters at U.N. headquarters Friday that “the secretary-general firmly believes in the need for dialogue between the parties involved as probably the best way to defuse tension and to avoid any escalation.”


Dujarric said the U.N. has been in contact with the parties at various levels and is passing the same message in public and it is in private, “which is to avoid any escalation.”


Dujarric announced that Guterres will be attending the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, next week but said he didn’t know yet if the secretary-general would meet there with U.S. President Donald Trump.


Tensions have escalated dramatically since Iran downed a large U.S. drone which it said violated its airspace. The U.S. said the unmanned drone was in international airspace.


1:35 p.m.


Diplomats say the United States has asked for a closed Security Council meeting on Monday on recent developments regarding Iran and the latest tanker incidents.


Two well-informed diplomats confirmed the U.S. request on Friday and said the closed consultations are likely to take place on Monday afternoon. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.


The request follows Iran’s downing of a large U.S. drone which it said violated its airspace. The U.S. said the unmanned drone was in international airspace.


The United States launched a retaliatory strike Thursday night which President Donald Trump said he canceled 10 minutes before it was to take place because he learned there could be 150 deaths.


The United States has also blamed Iran for using mines in the latest attacks on tankers in the Persian Gulf — which Tehran denies.
Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations.


1:20 p.m.


President Donald Trump says he called off a planned retaliatory strike on Iran after deciding the likely death toll on the ground wouldn’t be “proportionate” to the shoot down of a U.S. drone.


Trump tells NBC News in an interview Friday that he was informed that about 150 Iranians would be killed by the strikes.


Trump says: “I didn’t like it. I didn’t think it was proportionate.”


The president offered a similar explanation on Twitter earlier Friday.


The president also says he never gave a final order for the operation, and that U.S. military airplanes were not yet in the air but that they would have been “pretty soon.”


1:10 p.m.


U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says any “hostilities” with Iran “must not be initiated without the approval of Congress.”


The California Democrat said in a statement Friday that “We are in an extremely dangerous and sensitive situation with Iran.”


She spoke after President Donald Trump confirmed that he had ordered, then canceled, a retaliatory strike after Iran downed an unmanned American drone. A spokesman for Pelosi said the House speaker, second in line to the presidency, had not been notified of Trump’s plans.


At the White House a day earlier, Democratic leaders had warned Trump that “hostilities must not be initiated without the approval of Congress,” according to Pelosi.


She called for de-escalating the conflict and advancing American interests.


12:50 p.m.


President Donald Trump has discussed escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran with Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.


The White House says the leaders spoke Friday, the day after Trump confirmed that he canceled a military strike against Iran on Thursday after Iran downed a U.S. drone that it says was operating over Iranian airspace.


The U.S. says the drone had been flying over international waters when it was attacked.


Saudi Arabia and Iran are regional enemies. Trump has been stepping up a “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran.


Trump and bin Salman also discussed the kingdom’s role in ensuring stability in the Middle East and in the global oil market.


Trump has blamed Iran for recent attacks on oil tankers moving through the strategic Strait of Hormuz.


12 p.m.


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was not told of President Donald Trump’s aborted plan to strike back at Iran for shooting down a U.S. drone.


A spokesman for Pelosi said Friday she was not given a heads-up about the military action. Pelosi is second in line to the presidency behind Vice President Mike Pence.


Trump on Friday tweeted that the U.S. was “cocked and loaded” to retaliate against Iran for downing an unmanned American surveillance drone. But he said he canceled the strikes 10 minutes before launch time after being told 150 people could die.


Congressional leaders were briefed about Iran on Thursday in the secure White House Situation Room, but Democrats afterward said they were uncertain of Trump’s next steps.


10:50 a.m.


The long-haul carrier Etihad says it has “agreed to change a number of the flight paths we operate to and from” the Persian Gulf after Iran shot down a U.S. military drone.


Etihad made the statement Friday night. It said it would offer passengers more details on its website about their flights.


Abu Dhabi-based Etihad announced its decision after Emirates and FlyDubai similarly changed their flight paths.


The shooting down of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk has escalated already heightened tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


Major international airlines say they have rerouted their flights to avoid the area after the Federal Aviation Administration issued a warning to pilots early Friday.


9:25 a.m.


President Donald Trump says the U.S. was “cocked and loaded” to retaliate against Iran for downing an American drone, but canceled the strikes 10 minutes before they were to be carried out after being told some 150 people could die.


Trump tweeted Friday that the U.S. was ready to “retaliate last night on 3 different sights when I asked, how many will die.” He said a general told him 150 people, and he canceled the strikes as “not proportionate to shooting down an unmanned drone.”


Trump tweeted that the U.S. will never allow Iran to have a nuclear weapon. But he says he’s in no hurry to respond to the downing of the U.S. surveillance drone over the Strait of Hormuz.


He says U.S. sanctions are crippling the Iranian economy and that more are being added.


8:55 a.m.


The head of the Revolutionary Guard’s aerospace division says a manned U.S. spy plane was near the drone it shot down but Iran chose not to target it.


Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh made the comment Friday at a news conference attended by The Associated Press in Tehran.


The Guard shot down a U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk on Thursday.
Hajizadeh said: “At the same moment, another spy aircraft called a P8 was flying close to this drone. That aircraft is manned and has around 35 crew members. Well, we could have targeted that plane, it was our right to do so, and yes it was American, but we didn’t do it. We hit the unmanned aircraft.”


The U.S. military’s Central Command did not immediate respond to a request for comment.


8:45 a.m.


A Vatican cardinal is begging the U.S. and Iran to step back from escalating tensions in the Persian Gulf, calling instead for political friendship.


In a tweet Friday, Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson wrote: “On our knees, let’s pray USA & IRAN do not unsheathe the weapons of war!” He followed it by tweeting: “Let nations cultivate political friendship and not mutual demonization. The former builds peace, the latter kills it.”


Tensions have been heightened after Iran shot down a U.S. military surveillance drone over the Strait of Hormuz. The U.S. said it made plans for limited strikes on Iran in response, but then called them off.


Turkson heads the Holy See’s development and migrant department, and long headed the Vatican office of justice and peace.


8 a.m.


European Council President Donald Tusk is denying that the EU has been too passive in its response to rising tensions between the United States and Iran.


After chairing a summit of EU leaders in Brussels Friday, Tusk said that “sometimes it’s better not to intervene. The biggest problems in our history (were) always provoked by too active politics, not too passive.”


Tusk says the leaders “follow the situation closely and are very concerned about the developments in the Gulf region.”


But he says there was “no reason to prepare a specific European statement on this” at the summit.


The EU is urging restraint on both sides and the bloc’s top diplomat is in regular contact with the two. The EU is struggling to uphold the Iran nuclear deal, which is at risk of collapse due to U.S. sanctions.


7:50 a.m.


Indian officials say their navy has deployed two warships to the Gulf of Oman amid rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


Indian navy spokesman Dalip Kumar Sharma says the ships Chennai and Sunayna have deployed to the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman to undertake maritime security operations, escort Indian merchant ships and “coordinate between stakeholders.”


Indian military aircraft are also conducting aerial surveillance in the area.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has reached out to foreign leaders to convince them that the apparent attacks on the key Mideast shipping route is a problem for the world at large. Iran is India’s third-largest source of imported oil. Pompeo is visiting India next Tuesday, ahead of G20 talks in Osaka, Japan.


7:40 a.m.


The long-haul carrier Emirates, based in Dubai near the Strait of Hormuz, says it is “rerouting all flights away from areas of possible conflict” after Iran shot down a U.S. military drone.


Emirates made the announcement in a statement on Friday.


It added: “We are carefully monitoring the ongoing developments and are in close contact with the relevant government authorities with regards to our flight operations, and will make further operational changes if the need arises.”


Emirates is a government-owned airline. It’s low-cost sister carrier FlyDubai said it has also “adjusted” some of its flight paths.


The shootdown of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk has escalated already heightened tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


Major international airlines say they have rerouted their flights to avoid the area after the Federal Aviation Administration issued a warning to pilots early Friday.


7:25 a.m.


Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines are joining other airlines in rerouting flights away from the Strait of Hormuz area after Iran shot down a U.S. military drone there.


Singapore Airlines said on Friday that some of its flights will take “slightly longer routings” to avoid the area because of the ongoing tensions. It said the safety of its customers was its top priority and that it continuously reviews the areas that it overflies.


Malaysia Airlines said it has rerouted its flights to and from London, Jeddah and Medina because “safety is of utmost importance.” It said it is closely monitoring the situation and will be guided by various assessments, including security reports and advice from airspace control authorities.
British Airways, Australia’s Qantas and Dutch carrier KLM earlier announced they will reroute flights away from the Strait of Hormuz.


7:20 a.m.


German Chancellor Angel Merkel says European countries are still hoping that there can be a political solution to the tensions between the United States and Iran.


Merkel told reporters in Brussels on Friday that European governments’ foreign policy advisers had met on the sidelines of a European Council meeting to discuss the tensions in the region.


She says “naturally we are worried about the situation and we’re counting on diplomatic negotiations for a political solution to a very tense situation.”
Merkel did not elaborate further on her comments.


7:10 a.m.


The low-cost airline FlyDubai says it has “adjusted” some of its flight paths after the U.S. warned about the risk of commercial jetliners being attacked near the Strait of Hormuz following Iran’s shootdown of an American military surveillance drone.


FlyDubai told The Associated Press in a statement on Friday that it “adjusted some of the existing flight paths in the region as a precautionary measure.” It said it continues to monitor the situation.


The downing of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk has escalated already heightened tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


Major international airlines say they have rerouted their flights to avoid the area after the Federal Aviation Administration issued a warning to pilots early Friday.


6:35 a.m.


Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokeswoman says Germany welcomes reports that President Donald Trump apparently decided against immediate military strikes in retaliation for Iran’s downing of an American reconnaissance drone.


The spokeswoman was asked on Friday about reports that Trump approved military strikes and then decided against launching them the night before. Martina Fietz says that “regarding President Trump, I can say that there are numerous statements and indications that the American president would like to avoid a military confrontation and we naturally welcome that.”


Merkel has been calling for both sides to deescalate the tensions in the region and Fietz reiterated that “we welcome any steps that can contribute to de-escalation.”


6:15 a.m.


The head of the Revolutionary Guard’s aerospace division says Iran had warned a U.S. military surveillance drone several times before launching a missile at it.


Gen. Amir Ali Hajizadeh made the comment in an interview with Iranian state television on Friday. Debris from what Iranian authorities described as pieces of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk lay behind him.


Hajizadeh told state TV: “Unfortunately they did not answer.”


He added Iran collected the debris from its territorial waters. The U.S. military says that the drone was in international airspace over the Strait of Hormuz when it was shot down.


The shootdown of the drone has escalated already heightened tensions between the U.S. and Iran.


6 a.m.


Iran has summoned the Swiss ambassador to Tehran, who also represents U.S. interest in Iran, to protests what it claims was an incursion into Iranian airspace by an American drone.


The U.S. has disputed that, saying the Navy’s RQ-4A Global Hawk was shot down on Thursday over international waters, not inside Iranian airspace.
Iranian state TV on Friday reported that Swiss Ambassador Markus Leitner was summoned to hear Iran’s protest over the alleged violation.


Switzerland looks after the U.S. interests in Iran as Tehran and Washing have had no diplomatic relations since 1979.


Iran says the U.S. drone was a “very dangerous provocation” and urges the international community to demand that Washington end its drone spying.


5:35 a.m.


Iranian state television’s website has published images it says show debris from the U.S. military surveillance drone that Iran shot down the previous day.


The pictures show what appears to be the skin of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk. Iranian state television did not say where the debris was filmed.


The photographs did not show any circuit boards, wiring or electronic equipment.


An Iranian surface-to-air missile fired early Thursday brought down the RQ-4A Global Hawk, an unmanned aircraft with a wingspan larger than a Boeing 737 jetliner and costing over $100 million. The U.S. said it made plans for limited strikes on Iran in response, but then called them off.
The shootdown has further escalated tensions between Iran the U.S. as Tehran’s nuclear deal with world powers unravels.


5:20 a.m.


British Airways will re-route flights away from the Strait of Hormuz after Iran shot down a US military drone.


The decision comes after the Federal Aviation Administration barred American-registered aircraft from flying over Iranian-administered airspace in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.


BA joins Australia’s Qantas and Dutch carrier KLM in opting to change the routing of their planes to avoid tensions in the area.


BA says Friday that “our safety and security team are constantly liaising with authorities around the world as part of their comprehensive risk assessment into every route we operate.”


5 a.m.


German airline Lufthansa says it is no longer flying planes over the Strait of Hormuz or the Gulf of Oman after the shooting down by Iran of an American reconnaissance drone.


The carrier says that the flights were suspended over the two bodies of water on Thursday, and that the zone was expanded on Friday to include surrounding areas of land.


For the meantime, the airline, Germany’s largest, says its flights to Tehran will continue.


Lufthansa says the decision was based upon its own assessment of the situation.


4:15 a.m.


Abu Dhabi-based long-haul carrier Etihad says it has “contingency plans” after the U.S. barred American-registered planes from flying through Iranian-administered airspace in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.


Etihad’s statement to The Associated Press on Friday come as after a warning from the Federal Aviation Administration following Iran shooting down a U.S. military surveillance drone on Thursday.


Etihad said in a statement: “Etihad Airways is carefully monitoring the current situation. Contingency plans are in place, and we will decide what further action is required after carefully evaluating the FAA directive to U.S. carriers.”


4:10 a.m.


Dutch carrier KLM says its planes will not fly over Strait of Hormuz following the shooting down by Iran of a U.S. military surveillance drone. The airline announced the move Friday morning, saying in a brief statement that the “incident with the drone is reason not to fly over the Strait of Hormuz for the time being.”


KLM says the move is a “precautionary measure.”


The Dutch carrier’s decision comes after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration barred American-registered aircraft from flying over Iranian-administered airspace in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman in the aftermath of the downing of the drone.


4 a.m.


Australian airline Qantas says it will reroute flights away from the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman after Iran shot down a U.S. military surveillance drone.


Qantas said Friday it would affect its flights between Australia and London.


It stressed its flights pass over the region at 40,000 feet.


The decision on Friday comes after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration barred American-registered aircraft from flying over Iranian-administered airspace in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman over the Revolutionary Guard shooting down the U.S. drone, affecting a region crucial to global air travel.


1:30 a.m.


The United States made preparations for a military strike against Iran on Thursday night in retaliation for the downing of a U.S. surveillance drone, but the operation was abruptly called off with just hours to go. That from a U.S. official.


The official, who was not authorized to discuss the operation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, told the AP that the targets would have included radars and missile batteries. The New York Times reported that President Donald Trump had approved the strikes, but then called them off.


The newspaper cited anonymous senior administration officials.


The White House on Thursday night declined requests for comment.


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press.


The post The Latest: Donald Trump says he’s in ‘no hurry’ to strike Iran appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: The Latest: Donald Trump says he’s in ‘no hurry’ to strike Iran

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

8
The indefatigable Roy Moore spurns GOP leaders in Senate run

Never one to back down from a fight, Republican Roy Moore is facing a wall of GOP opposition that includes President Donald Trump as he launches another U.S. Senate bid, testing whether he can overcome the sexual misconduct allegations that helped derail his last run. The question is whether conservative Alabama voters who only narrowly [...]


The post The indefatigable Roy Moore spurns GOP leaders in Senate run appeared first on Alabama Today.




Never one to back down from a fight, Republican Roy Moore is facing a wall of GOP opposition that includes President Donald Trump as he launches another U.S. Senate bid, testing whether he can overcome the sexual misconduct allegations that helped derail his last run.


The question is whether conservative Alabama voters who only narrowly rejected Moore in favor of Democrat Doug Jones will now be willing to side with a maverick known for opposing gay marriage and defending his courthouse display of the Ten Commandments.


Moore, a one-time kickboxer who was twice removed as Alabama’s chief justice for disciplinary reasons, took on national Republican leaders and others in announcing his 2020 campaign on Thursday.


“People in Alabama are not only angry, they are going to act on that anger. They want Washington, and other people outside their state, out of this election,” Moore said. He blamed his 2017 loss to Jones on “a fraud.”
Despite allegations that he made sexual advances on young women decades ago — claims that helped put a reliably red seat in the Democratic column in 2017 — Moore cast himself as a righteous servant who evokes fear inside the Beltway.


“Why does the mere mention of my name cause people to get up in arms in Washington D.C?” added Moore. “Is it because I believe in God, and marriage and morality in our country? … Are these things embarrassing to them?”


Critics of Moore’s decision included Alabama’s senior senator.
“Alabama can do better than Roy Moore,” Republican Sen. Richard Shelby told reporters shortly before Moore’s announcement. Of the possibility of Moore securing the GOP nomination, he added: “I don’t think it’s good for the party nationally. … I don’t think it would help the president, I don’t think it would help anybody running.”


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was similarly blunt.


“He can do what he wants to, but we’re certainly going to oppose him in every way,” the Kentucky Republican said before Moore’s announcement.
Trump tweeted last month that Moore “cannot win” and said Republicans need to retake the seat to preserve what his administration has accomplished.


“Republicans cannot allow themselves to again lose the Senate seat in the Great State of Alabama,” Trump tweeted.


Asked whether Trump would support or oppose Moore, Erin Perrine — a spokeswoman for the president’s re-election campaign — said only that “I refer you to the president’s previous tweets on the matter.”


During the 2017 race, several women accused Moore of pursuing romantic or sexual relationships with them when they were teenagers and he was an assistant district attorney in his 30s. Two accused him of assault or molestation.


Moore denied the accusations and has said he considered his 2017 defeat, when he lost to Jones by 22,000 votes out of 1.3 million cast, a fraud.
He currently faces a defamation lawsuit from Leigh Corfman, who said Moore touched her sexually when she was 14 after meeting her at the courthouse. Moore has countersued Corfman and other accusers.
Moore’s entry upends an already crowded GOP primary field competing to challenge Jones.


U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville, legislator Arnold Mooney and businessman Stanley Adair have already announced bids and others are expected to enter the race.
Moore retains a strong following among some evangelical voters. He was twice elected the state’s chief justice but was twice stripped of those duties after a judicial ethics panel said he defied, or urged defiance of, federal court orders regarding same-sex marriage and the public display of the Ten Commandments.


His loyal following propelled him to victory in the 2017 primary and could give him another boost in 2020.


“I’m a hundred percent behind Judge Moore,” said Tim Sprayberry of Cleburne County, a supporter at Thursday’s announcement. “Judge Moore is one of the few candidates that I have ever seen that will tell you he is going to do something, and he does it regardless of what the consequences to him personally or his political career.”


Republican pollster Brent Buchanan said the crowded GOP primary will likely head to a runoff and said Moore is in the “catbird seat to have a spot in a runoff.”


But Steven Law, president of a GOP political committee linked to McConnell, said Moore faces tougher challenges this time around. That include competition vying for the same conservative religious voters who comprise the heart of Moore’s support and a less divided GOP, which in 2017 saw former Trump adviser Stephen Bannon helping insurgents like Moore.


“It’s a harder road for him this time,” said Law, who heads the Senate Leadership Fund.


Republished with permission of the Associated Press.


The post The indefatigable Roy Moore spurns GOP leaders in Senate run appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: The indefatigable Roy Moore spurns GOP leaders in Senate run

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

9
Martha Roby: Advocating for Alabama’s Military Installations

In Congress, I consider it a tremendous privilege and responsibility to represent a district that is home to two of our country’s finest military installations – Fort Rucker down in the Wiregrass and Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base in Montgomery. Even beyond the Second District, Alabama as a whole has a significant military footprint, and we [...]


The post Martha Roby: Advocating for Alabama’s Military Installations appeared first on Alabama Today.




In Congress, I consider it a tremendous privilege and responsibility to represent a district that is home to two of our country’s finest military installations – Fort Rucker down in the Wiregrass and Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base in Montgomery. Even beyond the Second District, Alabama as a whole has a significant military footprint, and we should all be very proud of our state’s role in defending our freedom.


I just recently had the opportunity to attend the Change of Command ceremony at Fort Rucker. Major General David Francis is now the Commanding General of USAACE and Fort Rucker, taking over the post from Major General William Gayler.


I have enjoyed working with Gen. Gayler, and I appreciate his steadfast leadership. I wish him the very best as he moves forward with his impressive career. Of course, congratulations are also in order for Gen. Francis. I look forward to continuing to build a strong relationship with him as we work together to advocate for Fort Rucker. It was a really exciting time to be in the Wiregrass, and I was glad to be on-post again to visit with some of our district’s military leaders.


Shifting focus to another part of our state, I also recently had the opportunity to speak on the House floor during consideration of the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Subcommittee Fiscal Year 2020 funding bill to raise awareness for the facility updates needed at Dannelly Field in Montgomery to support the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter mission.


In December of 2017, we received the exciting news that the 187th Fighter Wing at Dannelly Field was selected as a preferred location for the bed down of the coveted F-35 mission. The first aircraft is scheduled to arrive in the next few years, and Dannelly Field needs a correctly sized and properly configured maintenance facility to support and repair this next-generation fighter. The existing facilities that currently service the F-16 Red Tail’s squadron are inadequate. Aircraft maintenance is housed in three temporary trailer facilities, maintenance shops are 43 percent undersized, and the required tool storage is kept in aircraft parking spaces inside the hangar.


As we await the arrival of this cutting-edge aircraft, and as we continue through the Fiscal Year 2020 appropriations process, I look forward to working alongside my colleagues to address this pressing issue. We must provide our men and women in uniform adequate and acceptable working spaces so they can perform their jobs accurately and efficiently, and I will continue to advocate for these necessary facility updates at Dannelly.


The military installations in our district and across our great state perform vital work for the security of this nation, and I will always advocate for their proper support through my role in Congress. It is a true honor to have this platform to fight for the men and women who serve us all.


Martha Roby represents Alabama’s Second Congressional District. She lives in Montgomery, Alabama, with her husband Riley and their two children.


 


The post Martha Roby: Advocating for Alabama’s Military Installations appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Martha Roby: Advocating for Alabama’s Military Installations

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

10
Birmingham councilman Steven Hoyt suggest bringing in National Guard to address crime

Birmingham city councilman Steven Hoyt raised some eyebrows at the June 18 council meeting saying crime, specifically in Belview Heights and Ensley, was getting so bad that maybe the National Guard needed to be called in.  “Growing up, my mother told me if you don’t know how to do something, ask somebody. Get some help. [...]


The post Birmingham councilman Steven Hoyt suggest bringing in National Guard to address crime appeared first on Alabama Today.




Birmingham city councilman Steven Hoyt raised some eyebrows at the June 18 council meeting saying crime, specifically in Belview Heights and Ensley, was getting so bad that maybe the National Guard needed to be called in. 


“Growing up, my mother told me if you don’t know how to do something, ask somebody. Get some help. If the governor can’t get things in order, she calls the president. Maybe we need to call the National Guard in here to help us control this city,” Hoyt said.


He went on to clarify in an interview with CBS 42 that his remarks were intended to bring attention to the dire circumstances that a number of residents find themselves in, living in areas of the city where violent crime is rampant. Hoyt who has first hand experience with violence having been held up at gun point with his own family.


Watch his exchange with Mayor Woodfin here beginning at 1:54.



Woodfin’s response was, “We will not be calling the National Guard. I want to speak directly to the residents of Belview Heights who were not able to be here this morning but can hear my voice or are watching. Your neighborhood is very safe. These are not random killings. These are not random murders. These are interaction between people who know each other,” Woodfin said. “There is no terror in Belview Heights. Based on the definition of terrorism, these things that are happening are very personal in nature.”


The post Birmingham councilman Steven Hoyt suggest bringing in National Guard to address crime appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Birmingham councilman Steven Hoyt suggest bringing in National Guard to address crime

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

11
Alabama FBI investigator indicted on 7 felonies in Missouri Gov. case

A former FBI agent accused of botching the criminal investigation of former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens turned himself in Monday after being indicted on charges alleging that he lied in a deposition about his interview with a woman who had an affair with Greitens. William Tisaby surrendered to authorities on the same day that an [...]


The post Alabama FBI investigator indicted on 7 felonies in Missouri Gov. case appeared first on Alabama Today.




A former FBI agent accused of botching the criminal investigation of former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens turned himself in Monday after being indicted on charges alleging that he lied in a deposition about his interview with a woman who had an affair with Greitens.


William Tisaby surrendered to authorities on the same day that an indictment charging him with six counts of perjury and one count of tampering with physical evidence against him was unsealed.


Tisaby, who lives in Trussville, Alabama, was hired last year by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner to investigate allegations that Greitens took a compromising photo of his hairdresser and threatened to share it if she exposed their affair in 2015, a year before the Republican was elected governor. Charges were eventually dropped, but Greitens resigned last June.
Gardner’s handling of the Greitens case drew strong criticism from his attorneys, who asked police to investigate whether Tisaby lied under oath as part of a deposition of the hairdresser.
Gardner ultimately decided to dismiss the case after the judge granted a request by Greitens’ lawyers to call her to testify about Tisaby. Gardner said at the time that it put her in the “impossible” position of being a witness in a case she was prosecuting.
The indictment, which was filed under seal Friday in St. Louis Circuit Court, alleges that Tisaby lied under oath “about matters which could substantially affect, or did substantially affect, the course or outcome of the Greitens case.”
The indictment alleged that Tisaby denied taking notes during his interview of the hairdresser, although a recording of the interview that he initially said was unwatchable because of an equipment malfunction showed him doing so. The indictment also said that Tisaby said he didn’t receive notes from the prosecutor’s office before he interviewed the woman, although a document uncovered during the grand jury proceedings shows that Gardner had provided Tisaby her notes.
The indictment also was critical of Gardner, saying she failed to correct false statements. It also noted that relying on an outside investigator rather than police was “contrary to normal protocol.”
Scott Rosenblum, one of Greitens’ former lawyers, described the prosecution as “misguided” and said the allegations described in the indictment are “even more egregious than we thought.”
Tisaby, who pleaded not guilty at his arraignment Monday, was released on his own recognizance under the conditions that he surrenders his passport and informs a probation officer of any travel plans. His attorney, Jermaine Wooten, didn’t immediately return a phone message from The Associated Press seeking comment. He said previously that Tisaby is “very upset he’s being used as a scapegoat” and described him as “an honest and decent man.”
A spokesman for Gerard Carmody, the special prosecutor assigned to oversee the investigation, and a spokeswoman for Gardner said they are unable to comment because of a gag order in the case.


The post Alabama FBI investigator indicted on 7 felonies in Missouri Gov. case appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Alabama FBI investigator indicted on 7 felonies in Missouri Gov. case

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

12
Alabama / Roy Moore announces he’ll run for US Senate again in 2020
« on: June 23, 2019, 08:44:31 PM »
Roy Moore announces he’ll run for US Senate again in 2020

Alabama Republican Roy Moore announced Thursday that he is running for U.S. Senate again in 2020 after failing to win the seat two years ago amid sexual misconduct accusations. With his return to the political stage, Moore faces a crowded GOP primary field as he aims for an eventual rematch against Democratic Sen. Doug Jones, [...]


The post Roy Moore announces he’ll run for US Senate again in 2020 appeared first on Alabama Today.




Alabama Republican Roy Moore announced Thursday that he is running for U.S. Senate again in 2020 after failing to win the seat two years ago amid sexual misconduct accusations.


With his return to the political stage, Moore faces a crowded GOP primary field as he aims for an eventual rematch against Democratic Sen. Doug Jones, who bested him in the 2017 special election to fill the seat previously held by Jeff Sessions.


“I believe in America. I believe we’ve got to have politicians that go to Washington and do what they say,” Moore said during his announcement.
Some state and national Republicans, worried that Moore’s too polarizing and could jeopardize what should otherwise be a reliable GOP seat, have discouraged him from entering the race. Republicans see retaking the Alabama seat as a top priority in 2020.”He can do what he wants to, but we’re certainly going to oppose him in every way,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, said in a brief interview with The Associated Press before Moore’s announcement.


President Donald Trump tweeted last month that Moore “cannot win” and said Republicans need to retake the seat in the once reliably red state.
“Republicans cannot allow themselves to again lose the Senate seat in the Great State of Alabama,” Trump wrote in a tweet.


“I have NOTHING against Roy Moore,” Trump wrote, but warned that “Roy Moore cannot win.”


Moore brushed aside that criticism Thursday: “Can I win? Yes I can win.”
He says establishment Republicans don’t want him in the Senate.


During the 2017 race, six women accused Moore of pursuing romantic or sexual relationships with them when they were teenagers as young as 14 and he was an assistant district attorney in his 30s. Two accused him of assault or molestation.


Moore denied the accusations and has said he considered his 2017 defeat, when he lost to Jones by 22,000 votes out of 1.3 million cast, “a fraud.”
A crowded GOP primary field is competing to challenge Jones. U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville and legislator Arnold Mooney have already announced bids.


kMoore retains a strong following among some evangelical voters in the state. He was twice elected as the state’s chief justice but was twice stripped of those duties after a judicial ethics panel said he defied, or urged defiance of, federal court orders regarding same-sex marriage and the public display of the Ten Commandments.


The post Roy Moore announces he’ll run for US Senate again in 2020 appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Roy Moore announces he’ll run for US Senate again in 2020

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

13
Vladimir Putin open for talks with Donald Trump, warns against force on Iran

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that he’s open for a meeting with United States President Donald Trump but doesn’t expect quick progress on easing tensions with Washington. The Russian leader also strongly warned the United States against using force on Iran, saying it will trigger a “catastrophe.” Trump said he would meet with Putin [...]


The post Vladimir Putin open for talks with Donald Trump, warns against force on Iran appeared first on Alabama Today.




Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that he’s open for a meeting with United States President Donald Trump but doesn’t expect quick progress on easing tensions with Washington.


The Russian leader also strongly warned the United States against using force on Iran, saying it will trigger a “catastrophe.”


Trump said he would meet with Putin on the sidelines of next week’s G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, but the Kremlin noted that the White House hasn’t formally requested the meeting yet.


Speaking during a live marathon call-in show that lasted more than four hours, Putin said he’s ready to hold more talks with Trump.


“Dialogue is always good and necessary,” Putin said. “If the American side shows interest in that, we are naturally ready for a dialogue as much as our partners are.”


He added that Russia and the U.S. particularly need to focus on arms control issues, including the future of the New Start arms treaty that is set to expire in 2021.


Putin charged that U.S.-Russian relations have become hostage to the U.S. domestic political infighting ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential election, clouding prospects for their improvement.


“Our relations aren’t going to be easy, given the fact that part of the American establishment is speculating on Russia-U.S. relations, trying to muddy the waters to make some gains and inventing all kinds of fake (news),” he said.


The Russian leader has denied meddling in the 2016 U.S. election to help Trump win despite the evidence to the contrary uncovered by U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller.


Putin added that Trump’s re-election bid will make easing tensions even more unlikely.


“Even if the president wants to take some steps forward, to discuss something, there are plenty of restrictions coming from other state structures,” Putin said.


Putin was questioned on a report by The New York Times about U.S. cyberattacks on Russian energy infrastructure, which Trump has denounced as an “act of treason” in an angry tweet this week. Putin said Russia takes the matter seriously.


“I heard about The New York Times article and saw the reaction of the president, who called them traitors,” Putin said. “I don’t know how we should interpret it, whether they uncovered true information or it was a fake. In any case, we need to react to that (but) we must understand what was it.”


“It’s important to protect our vital infrastructure,” Putin added.
Russian news anchors claimed the call center repeatedly came under cyberattacks during the show but they were successfully fended off.
During the show, Putin warned the U.S. that an attack on Iran would have enormous consequences, adding it would trigger an escalation of hostilities across the region.


“It would be a catastrophe for the region as a minimum,” he said,
Tensions have been mounting recently over last week’s attacks on tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, assaults that Washington has blamed on Iran. Iran has denied the accusations.


Putin noted that Iran has abided by the terms of a landmark nuclear deal despite the U.S. withdrawal from the accord, adding that he considers U.S. sanctions against Iran unfounded.


Asked if Russia could be willing to negotiate a “grand bargain” with the U.S. on Syria and other issues, Putin responded by saying that “we aren’t trading in our allies, our interests and our principles.”


He added, however, that it’s necessary to discuss regional issues with various players, including the United States.


Answering a question about Ukraine, Putin criticized the country’s new president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, for recent comments in which he refused to negotiate directly with the Moscow-backed separatists who have overrun large swathes of eastern Ukraine. A 2015 peace deal called for direct negotiations between the Ukrainian government in Kiev and the separatists with the mediation of Russia, France and Germany.


Putin said the “political will of the Ukrainian leadership” is necessary to stop the hostilities between Ukrainian troops and Russia-backed insurgents that have killed more than 13,000 people since 2014. Putin pointed out that Zelenskiy’s campaign promises to bring peace to the east and stop the fighting haven’t yet been fulfilled.


The tightly-choreographed call-in provided a rare opportunity for Russians across the vast country to take their grievances to the very top, so it was dominated by complaints about low wages, potholed roads, decrepit schools, overwhelmed hospitals and other social issues.


More than 1.5 million people sent in questions by phone, video or email.
Facing a litany of complaints about low living standards, Putin promised to boost wages and pensions and boost social programs. He noted that Russia has been hurt by a drop in energy prices worldwide and by international sanctions, but added that the economy has improved.


Putin acknowledged that U.S. and the European Union sanctions have cost Russia an estimated $50 billion since 2014, but he claimed that EU nations have suffered even greater damage because of the restrictions. It was not immediately possible to verify such a claim.


The Russian leader said the sanctions have encouraged Moscow to launch its own production of ship engines and other key industrial products and develop its agricultural sector. He said Russia’s agricultural exports topped $25 billion last year and will keep growing.


Putin charged that the Western sanctions represent an attempt to curb Russia’s growing power, adding that U.S. trade restrictions against China serve a similar purpose.


He noted U.S. sanctions against the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, describing it as part of U.S. efforts to “contain the development of China as a global power.”


“The same thing is happening with regard to Russia and it will keep going. So if we want to win a place under the sun, we simply need to get stronger, primarily in the economic sphere,” he said.


Nataliya Vasilyeva contributed to this report.


By Vladimir Isachenkov Associated Press.


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press.


The post Vladimir Putin open for talks with Donald Trump, warns against force on Iran appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Vladimir Putin open for talks with Donald Trump, warns against force on Iran

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

14
Hope Hicks rebuffs questions on Donald Trump White House in interview

Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks refused to answer questions related to her time in the White House in a daylong interview with the House Judiciary Committee, dimming Democrats’ chances of obtaining new or substantive information about President Donald Trump in their first interview with a person linked to his inner circle. Frustrated Democrats [...]


The post Hope Hicks rebuffs questions on Donald Trump White House in interview appeared first on Alabama Today.




Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks refused to answer questions related to her time in the White House in a daylong interview with the House Judiciary Committee, dimming Democrats’ chances of obtaining new or substantive information about President Donald Trump in their first interview with a person linked to his inner circle.


Frustrated Democrats leaving the meeting Wednesday said Hicks and her lawyer rigidly followed White House orders to stay quiet about her time there and said they would be forced to go to court to obtain answers.


House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Democrat-New York, said Hicks’ lawyers asserted the White House’s principle that as one of Trump’s close advisers she is “absolutely immune” from talking about her time there because of separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches. Nadler said that principle is “ridiculous” and Democrats intend to “destroy” it in court.


Nadler said the committee plans to take the administration to court on the immunity issue, and Hicks’ interview would be part of that litigation.


In a letter Tuesday to Nadler, White House counsel Pat Cipollone wrote that Trump had directed Hicks not to answer questions “relating to the time of her service as a senior adviser to the president.” The White House has similarly cited broad executive privilege with respect to many of the Democrats’ other investigative demands, using the president’s power to withhold information to protect the confidentiality of the Oval Office decision-making process.


Hicks did answer some questions about her time on Trump’s campaign, the lawmakers said, but they said they learned little that was new.


“She’s objecting to stuff that’s already in the public record,” California Rep. Karen Bass said on a break from the interview. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Democrat-Washington, called her answers “a farce.”


California Rep. Ted Lieu tweeted about the meeting while it was ongoing, writing that Hicks refused to answer even innocuous questions such as whether she had previously testified before Congress and where her office was located in the White House.


In all, she was behind closed doors for eight hours, with an hourlong break for lunch.


Democrats pressed Hicks on episodes she might have witnessed as one of Trump’s closest advisers. During questioning about the campaign, Rep. Madeleine Dean, Democrat-Pennsylvania, said she asked Hicks if she had been aware of any outreach from the Russians. After Hicks responded no, Dean named apparent contacts, such as emails, some of which are mentioned in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report. Hicks said she hadn’t thought those contacts were “relevant,” according to Dean.


Republicans had a different perspective, saying she was cooperative and the interview was a waste of time, especially in light of Mueller’s two-year investigation. The top Republican on the panel, Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, said after the interview that the committee “took eight hours to find out what really most of us knew at the beginning.”


Hicks was a key witness for Mueller, delivering important information to the special counsel’s office about multiple episodes involving the president. Mueller wrote in his report released in April that there was not enough evidence to establish a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russia, but said he could not exonerate Trump on obstruction of justice. The report examined several situations in which Trump attempted to influence or curtail Mueller’s investigation.


Democrats has planned to ask Hicks about several of those episodes, including efforts to remove Mueller from the investigation, pressure on former Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the firing of FBI Director James Comey. They also planned to ask about Hicks’ knowledge of hush-money payments orchestrated by former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen to two women who claimed to have had affairs with Trump — the porn actress Stormy Daniels and model Karen McDougal. Trump has denied the allegations. Cohen is now serving three years in prison partly for campaign violations related to the payments.


One lawmaker who was in the room said Hicks would not answer many of those questions. The person requested anonymity to discuss the closed-door interview.


As Hicks spoke to the committee, Trump tweeted throughout the day. He said the interview was “extreme Presidential Harassment,” and wrote that Democrats “are very unhappy with the Mueller Report, so after almost 3 years, they want a Redo, or Do Over.”


He also tweeted that it was “so sad that the Democrats are putting wonderful Hope Hicks through hell.”


Trump has broadly stonewalled House Democrats’ investigations and said he will fight “all of the subpoenas.”


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is taking a methodical approach to investigating Trump. More than 60 lawmakers in her caucus — including around a dozen on the Judiciary Committee — have called for opening an impeachment inquiry, but she has said she wants committees to investigate first and come to a decision on impeachment later.


While Trump has continued to block their requests, Democrats have recently made some minor gains, such as the Justice Department’s agreement to make some underlying evidence from Mueller’s report available to committee members.


The Judiciary panel wanted a higher-profile interview with Hicks, subpoenaing her for public testimony. But they agreed to the private interview after negotiations. A transcript of the session will be released in the coming days.


The committee has also subpoenaed Hicks for documents, but she has only partially complied. She agreed to provide some information from her work on Trump’s campaign, but none from her time at the White House because of the administration’s objections.


Also Wednesday, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said Russia-born business executive Felix Sater will talk to House intelligence committee staff behind closed doors as part of its investigation into Russian election interference.


Schiff wouldn’t give a date for the interview, but another person familiar with the meeting said it will happen Friday. The person requested anonymity to discuss the private interview.


Sater worked with Cohen on a Trump Tower deal in Moscow before the 2016 election. The project was later abandoned.


Schiff said the committee will also talk to “other witnesses related to Moscow Trump Tower” in future interviews.


Associated Press writers Padmananda Rama and Eric Tucker contributed to this report.


By Mary Clare Jalonick and Laurie Kellman Associated Press.


Republished with the permission of the Associated Press.


The post Hope Hicks rebuffs questions on Donald Trump White House in interview appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: Hope Hicks rebuffs questions on Donald Trump White House in interview

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

15
J. Pepper Bryars: Dad-deprived homes reach crisis levels in Alabama

Fathers Day has come and gone, and sadly so too has the concept of fatherhood in many parts of Alabama. Nearly half of all babies born here are to unmarried women, according to the latest information from the Alabama Department of Public Health. This is a crisis. It is a crisis that researchers have shown significantly contributes [...]


The post J. Pepper Bryars: Dad-deprived homes reach crisis levels in Alabama appeared first on Alabama Today.




Fathers Day has come and gone, and sadly so too has the concept of fatherhood in many parts of Alabama.

Nearly half of all babies born here are to unmarried women, according to the latest information from the Alabama Department of Public Health.

This is a crisis.

It is a crisis that researchers have shown significantly contributes to nearly every challenge facing our state – education, health, addiction, crime, and economic mobility to name just a few.

While dad-deprived homes cause problems for both sexes, it has a particularly damaging impact on young men.

“The boy crisis resides where dads do not reside,” said Warren Farrell, author of The Boy Crisis during a recent episode of the 1819 podcast.

While single mothers are making heroic efforts in Alabama, Ferrell said that young men growing up without a father in the house face enormous odds. Boys in this situation, he said, stand a greater chance than their female counterparts of doing poorly in school, being overweight, being both the bully and the bullied, of going to prison, and becoming addicted to drugs, pornography, and video games.

A father’s natural way of parenting, Ferrell explained, adds something that boys critically need and do very poorly without.

“While boys who are motivated can become many of society’s most constructive forces … boys whose energies are poorly channeled can become society’s most destructive forces,” he wrote.

The research indicates this is a slow-moving train wreck that doesn’t show any signs of stopping. In 2005, the Alabama Department of Public Health found that a little more than 35 percent of babies were born to unmarried mothers. By 2017, and despite a statewide initiative and many programs aimed at improving fatherhood across the state, that number had skyrocketed to more than 47 percent.

The research cited in Farrell’s book is alarming:

“Children who were born poor and raised by both married parents had an 80 percent chance of moving to the middle class or above; conversely, children who were born into the middle class and raised without a married dad were almost four times as likely to end up considerably poorer.”

“A study of boys from similar backgrounds revealed that by the third grade, the boys whose fathers were present scored higher on every achievement test and received higher grades.”

“71 percent of high school dropouts have minimal or no father involvement.”

“Around 90 percent of runaway and homeless youths are from fatherless homes.”

“Every 1 percent increase in fatherlessness in a neighborhood predicts a three-percent increase in adolescent violence.”

Farrell offered many partial solutions, from increasing recess time during school to recruiting more male teachers to educate people about the uniquely helpful aspects of dad-focused parenting.

But to solve this problem, we must first identify and agree that it’s indeed a problem and one worth marshaling our collective resources to solve.

Yet it doesn’t appear to be on anyone’s radar.

It doesn’t show up on the latest survey by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama detailing what issues are most important to our state’s citizens. Not to conservatives. Not to liberals. Not to men or women. Not even to those who the report highlights as “experts” in public policy.

I don’t recall it being a noticeable talking point during any recent political campaign either.

Yet on every one of the report’s lists, and in many recent campaigns, were issues that are symptoms of fatherlessness – poor education, crime, poverty, substance abuse. The correlations go on and on.

To be fair, there are many fathers performing admirably in Alabama. I see such examples every day. We should be thankful for them and use their work to build a foundation upon.

But we must face the fact that we’re not doing too well in this regard as a state, as a society.

And not until we confront this problem as a society – liberals and conservatives, through government and private-sector efforts – will we be able to reverse this trend.


J. Pepper Bryars is a senior fellow at the Alabama Policy Institute and host of the 1819 podcast. Follow him on Twitter at @jpepperbryars.


The post J. Pepper Bryars: Dad-deprived homes reach crisis levels in Alabama appeared first on Alabama Today.


Source: J. Pepper Bryars: Dad-deprived homes reach crisis levels in Alabama

Alabama Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16

Powered by EzPortal