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1
Denver weather: Severe storms in the forecast for Sunday afternoon with possible 2-inch hail

Expect stormy weather, including hail and strong winds, in metro Denver and across the Eastern Plains on Sunday afternoon as an upper-level disturbance centered over Arizona pushes into the state.

Expect stormy weather, including hail and strong winds, in metro Denver and across the Eastern Plains on Sunday afternoon as an upper-level disturbance centered over Arizona pushes into the state.





“We could see a few severe storms, probably starting after 1 p.m., with the highest threat extending from Denver to the Wyoming border,” said Scott Entrekin, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Boulder.


The storms could become severe enough to produce large hail, up to 2 inches in diameter, with damaging winds and possibly a tornado, he said.



Low-level moisture increased sharply overnight and temperatures are expected to approach 80 degrees.


“We have enough ingredients so that whatever storms do develop will go severe,” Entrekin said.


Southeastern Colorado, extending up into Cheyenne and Kit Carson counties, is expected to see the most intense activity. But northeast Colorado, from the metro area to the Kansas and Nebraska borders, is forecast to see thunderstorms that will send those enjoying the holiday outdoors scrambling for cover.





Storms are expected to last through midnight, after which things will calm down. Memorial Day also looks like an unsettled day for weather, with severe storms possible north of Denver to the Wyoming border, Entrekin said.





Source: Denver weather: Severe storms in the forecast for Sunday afternoon with possible 2-inch hail

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

2
Longtime Rockies trainer Keith Dugger is the heart and soul of franchise

Rockies fans might recognize Keith Dugger as the man in the polo shirt and khakis who jogs onto the diamond to check out a player who fouls a ball off his shin.

Rockies fans might recognize the man in the polo shirt and khakis who jogs onto the diamond to check out a player who fouls a ball off his shin.


Or perhaps they have a hazy memory of Keith Dugger from Game 163 of the magical 2007 season. As the Rockies celebrated their wild, comeback victory over the Padres, there was Dugger, calm and concerned, tending to a dazed Matt Holliday moments after Holliday crash landed at home plate to score the winning run in the 13th inning.


Casual fans have likely never heard of the man everyone around the Rockies calls “Doogie.” Such anonymity sits just fine with Dugger, who has been with the organization 27 years, the last 15 as head trainer, and carries an import even he perhaps doesn’t realize.


All-star third baseman Nolan Arenado considers Dugger, 53, a combination doctor, trainer, psychologist, baseball dad, big brother, friend, and confidant. Manager Bud Black calls Dugger “vital to the organization.”



Veteran catcher Chris Iannetta, who’s played for four major-league teams, said, “When you are in the training room with Doogie, you feel like you’re talking to a doctor, just minus the degree. He’s seen everything and his evaluation skills are the best I’ve ever seen. He puts the players’ interests first, plus he knows the game.


“All of that makes him indispensable. We joke with him that he’s the actual GM. We’ll say, ‘Doogie, please don’t send us down, please don’t trade us.’ Because, really, he’s been here so long and his opinions really matter.”


One story, perhaps above all others, explains why Dugger holds such a revered place within the organization.


“Very recently, an official from another team asked me about Doogie; asked me how good he is,” said former major-league outfielder Ryan Spilborghs, now a Rockies TV analyst. “I told the man, ‘Just go back and watch what Doogie did when Juan Nicasio broke his neck on the mound on that terrible day. That tells you all you need to know.’ ”


Spilborghs, who was on the bench in the Rockies dugout at Coors Field on the hot evening of Aug. 5, 2011, vividly remembers the chilling moment. Ian Desmond, then playing for the Nationals, smashed a line drive off Nicasio’s temple. Nicasio tumbled awkwardly onto the slope of the mound. The impact of the fall fractured the C1 vertebra in his neck.


“Doogie was out there in seconds. It was almost like Doogie was out there before Nicasio even hit the ground,” Spilborghs recalled. “You hear about those guys who are the first to run into a burning house? That was Doogie. He saved Nicasio’s life.”


Dugger recalled that his heart was beating wildly when he sprinted to the mound, but then his training kicked in and a calm settled over him as he assessed the situation.


“When I initially went out there I was worried about the skull fracture because I could see it swelling right at the temple. Juan was telling me in Spanish that he had electricity going down through his legs,” Dugger recalled. “So I knew something was really wrong. He was starting to pass out when he told me in English and again in Spanish that the pain was in his neck.”


Thanks in large part to Dugger’s expertise and subsequent care, Nicasio was stabilized, rushed to the hospital, then made a remarkable comeback. About six weeks after the injury, Nicasio said he believed he would pitch again. The next spring, he made the Rockies’ opening-day roster. Today, Nicasio is a relief pitcher for Philadelphia.


Colorado Rockies starting pitcher Juan Nicasio ...
Barry Gutierrez, The Associated Press
Colorado Rockies starting pitcher Juan Nicasio is surrounded by teammates and manager Jim Tracy (4) before medical personnel take him off the field after Washington Nationals’ Ian Desmond hit a line drive, hitting Nicasio in the head, during the second inning of a baseball game Friday, Aug. 5, 2011, in Denver. Troy Tulowitzki (2) takes a knee.

                                                                      *     *     * 


The nomadic Dugger is always on call. His place of employment is the training room at Coors Field or at major-league ballparks across the country. He goes down early to spring training in Arizona and spends weeks at the Rockies’ Dominican Republic complex in Boca Chica during the off-season.


“He’s an extremely valuable resource of knowledge, feel and instinct, for all of us,” Black said. “For the front office, coaching staff and players, he’s invaluable.”


Rockies assistant trainer Scott Gehret, who’s worked with Dugger for 23 years, raises the bar even higher.


“Doogie’s ability to, first and foremost, evaluate, treat and rehabilitate injuries is probably the best in baseball,” Gehret said. “He’s a great mentor, a great friend and he has a great passion for his work.”


Dugger humbly accepts such praise, but he adamantly stresses that it’s his teamwork with Gehret and rehabilitation coordinator Scott Murayama that keeps the Rockies rolling. And Dugger insists that a story profiling him must mention his wife, Shannon, whom he calls a “rock star.” Together they have raised two children, daughter Tianna (19) and son Cashel (13).


Dugger played baseball at Del Oro High School in Loomis, Calif. and was good enough to play junior college baseball at Yuba College in Marysville, Calif. He tried to make it as a player at San Diego State, but when that dream died he pursued his passion as an athletic trainer.


After graduating from SDSU, he worked three years within the San Diego Padres farm system before joining the Rockies organization in 1992. He earned the award as the Pacific Coast League’s “Athletic Trainer of the Year” in 1997 before moving to the big club in 1998 as the Rockies’ assistant trainer under Tom Probst. Dugger was promoted to head trainer in November 2004.


He’s called Doogie, not because he was a baby-faced trainer when the TV show “Doogie Howser, M.D.” was popular from 1989-93, but because a couple of Padres minor-leaguers couldn’t pronounce his name.


“It’s ‘Dug-er,’ but these guys kept saying, ‘Doo-ger,’ so it became ‘Doogie,” he explained. “But, as you know, everyone in baseball needs a nickname.”


When Dugger worked the minors with the Padres, he did double-time as a bullpen catcher and often threw batting practice. These days, he plays catch with Rockies players before most games and shags ball during BP.


“I love going to batting practice, I love playing catch with the guys, I love being part of their rehab,” he said. “I can still hit fungos, even though these creaky old bones don’t work quite like they used to. It’s a passion, it keeps you young. You don’t have to play the sport, but if you understand the sport you’re involved in, you get quite a bit of respect from the players.”


Said right fielder Charlie Blackmon: “Doogie knows the game, for sure. That’s important. But what sets him apart is who he is as a person. He’s a super-likable guy.”


                                                                  *   *  *


But he’s no pushover. Conflicts arise when players want to get back on the field too early after an injury, or not soon enough, and it’s Dugger who lays down the law. And it’s Dugger, more than anyone in the organization, who has his finger on the pulse of the team. Players talk to him about marriages, kids, girlfriends, hopes, dreams, and fears. He’s the keeper of the flame and the keeper of secrets.


Arenado butts heads with Dugger, from time to time, which is not a bad thing.


“Doogie has always been there for me, but he’s not afraid to give it to me straight when I have a bad moment,” Arenado said. “He calls me out for certain things.


“I mean, I’ll get bummed out if I’m not hitting well, because I’m so hard on myself, and he’ll say, ‘Come on, stop pouting, you have a game to play.’ He knows that he can cross the line with me a little bit more than other people, and I let him, because I know where he’s coming from.”


Keith Dugger has been with the ...
Joe Amon, The Denver Post
Keith Dugger has been with the Rockies for 27 years, 15 as the head trainer talks with Colorado Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado #28 during batting practice at Coors Field 2019 Denver, Colorado May 24, 2019.

Last August, for instance, Arenado began experiencing chronic pain in his right shoulder, and it was freaking him out a little bit. He leaned on Dugger, who kept him on the field for Colorado’s stretch run into the playoffs.


“It got to the point where it was hurting so much I had trouble throwing,” Arenado recalled. “But he got me ready fast, quicker than I thought he could. And everything played out exactly like he said. He gave me a game plan to follow and it fell exactly into place like he said it would. He’s been around a long time, and he’s someone I can trust.”


Blackmon says Dugger’s “bedside manner” soothes worried minds.


“When I get hurt, I wouldn’t say I panic or overreact, but it’s a really big deal when all of a sudden you can’t do what you’re paid to do,” Blackmon said. “Doogie has this ability to put things into perspective. He lets you know it’s not something he hasn’t seen before, and he’ll explain how a lot of guys get over the same injury.”


In 2010, for instance, Iannetta had a disc injury in his back. He was only 27  but he worried his career might be over.


“I thought it was the end of the world,” Iannetta said. “But Doogie says, ‘So and so had this injury, and so and so had that injury. You’re going to be fine.’ He was right.”


Dugger is constantly reading, consulting and interacting with others in sports medicine to bone up on the latest treatments and techniques in a rapidly evolving field. But that’s only part of his job description.


“The biggest thing about my job is having relationships with these guys,” he said. “You have to be a good communicator and a good listener. You can agree to disagree.  That’s how you build trust. You have to be honest. I think our entire medical staff is that way.


“If we don’t know an answer, we’ll look for it. I don’t have the ego to think I know everything. What I do have is experience. I have seen a lot of different things. I have seen players go through things on and off the field and I can use that to make comparisons and learn lessons.”


Dugger cherishes the lifelong relationships he’s formed with players such as Rockies icon Todd Helton, whom he calls “my brother.” Dugger often fields phone calls from former players seeking medical advice or simply wanting to talk.


“Probably close to 100 percent of our players, I still have a relationship with,” he said. “That’s good and bad, because then they’ll still call you before a doctors appointments and advice when they live in Tampa, Fla.”


The Dugger paused, chuckled, and thought about a recent phone call from former Rockies pitcher Josh Fogg.


“Sorry, ‘Fogger,’ I’m not getting you a discount,” he said.





Source: Longtime Rockies trainer Keith Dugger is the heart and soul of franchise

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

3
Hawaii woman missing for 2 weeks rescued from Maui forest

WAILUKU, Hawaii — A Hawaii woman has been found alive in a forest on Maui island after going missing more than two weeks ago. Amanda Eller was found injured in the Makawao Forest Reserve, the Maui News reported Friday. Family spokeswoman Sarah Haynes confirmed she spoke with Eller’s father, John. Eller was airlifted to safety. […]

WAILUKU, Hawaii — A Hawaii woman has been found alive in a forest on Maui island after going missing more than two weeks ago.


Amanda Eller was found injured in the Makawao Forest Reserve, the Maui News reported Friday.


Family spokeswoman Sarah Haynes confirmed she spoke with Eller’s father, John. Eller was airlifted to safety.


“I was crying tears of joy,” Eller’s mother, Julia, said. “I never gave up hope for a minute. I knew that we would find her.”


The physical therapist from the Maui town of Haiku went missing on May 8. Her white Toyota RAV4 was found in the forest parking lot with her phone and wallet inside.


Hundreds of volunteers have searched for her since. Eller’s parents had offered a $10,000 reward to encourage people to find her.


Javier Cantellops said he was searching for Eller from a helicopter along with Chris Berquist and Troy Helmers when they spotted her about 3:45 p.m. near the Kailua reservoir, according to Maui Police Department spokesman Lt. Gregg Okamoto and the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.


Cantellops told the newspaper that she was in the bed of a creek with waterfalls on either side.


He told CNN he saw Eller waving her hands at the helicopter.


“It was unbelievable, dude,” Cantellops said. “Seeing her for the first time in a long time was just unbelievable. It was nothing short of elation.”


Eller was in an area with thick vegetation, he said. “That vegetation is so thick, it’s a miracle that we saw her,” Cantellops told CNN.


The Maui Fire Department brought Eller to a hospital for evaluation, Okamoto said in a statement.


Her mother told the Maui News that Amanda Eller survived by staying near a water source and eating wild raspberries and strawberry guavas. She even ate a couple of moths, Julia Eller said.


Her daughter tried to catch some crawfish, but she was “not very successful,” Julia Eller said.


“She lost quite a bit of weight, as you can imagine, being lost for that amount of time,” Julia Eller said. “But she was able to survive it. She had the right skills and did the right things to buy time so that we had a chance to find her.”


Amanda Eller suffered a leg fracture, abrasions on her ankles and a severe sunburn, but Julia Eller told the Maui News that her daughter’s spirits were good.


“And all of those things are treatable,” Julia Eller said.


A photo was posted to a Facebook page tracking the search, showing a smiling Eller with what appeared to be injuries to her face and dirt on her clothing. The photo shows Eller surrounded by Cantellops, Berquist and Helmers.


Maui County Mayor Michael Victorino said he’s grateful for the efforts of family, friends, volunteers and first-responders.


“This search and rescue was truly a community collaboration of Maui County first responders, family, friends and community volunteers,” Victorino said in a statement. “I extend my deepest appreciation for everyone involved in searching for and locating Amanda. Your work, determination and sacrifice has helped return her to her loving family. God bless them all.”


___


Information from: The Maui News, http://www.mauinews.com





Source: Hawaii woman missing for 2 weeks rescued from Maui forest

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

4
State abortion bans may hand Democrats a political weapon

A flood of laws banning abortions in Republican-run states has handed Democrats a political weapon heading into next year’s elections, helping them paint the GOP as extreme and court centrist voters who could decide congressional races in swing states, members of both parties say.

WASHINGTON — A flood of laws banning abortions in Republican-run states has handed Democrats a political weapon heading into next year’s elections, helping them paint the GOP as extreme and court centrist voters who could decide congressional races in swing states, members of both parties say.


The Alabama law outlawing virtually all abortions, even in cases of rape or incest, is the strictest so far. Besides animating Democrats, the law has prompted President Donald Trump, other Republican leaders and lawmakers seeking reelection next year to distance themselves from the measure.


Their reaction underscores that Republicans have risked overplaying their hand with severe state laws that they hope will prod the Supreme Court, with its ascendant conservative majority, to strike down Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion. It also illustrates the way that those statutes are forcing the GOP to struggle over how to satisfy its core anti-abortion supporters without alienating the vast majority of voters averse to strictly curbing abortion.


The Alabama law is “a loser for Republican candidates in Colorado, without question, and in many other swing parts of the country, because it’s extreme,” said David Flaherty, a Colorado-based Republican consultant who’s worked on congressional races around the country. “It’s only going to widen the gender gap.”


Brian Fitzpatrick, a Vanderbilt Law School professor and former aide to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said there are many “women, moderate women who are going to be scared that this right that they thought they had for the last 40-some years is going to be shelved” and they will be motivated to vote.


GOP Sens. Joni Ernst of Iowa and Susan Collins of Maine, both seeking reelection next year, said the Alabama ban goes too far by eliminating exceptions for pregnancies involving rape or incest. A 2005 survey by the Guttmacher Institute, which backs abortion rights, found about 1% of women said they had abortions because of rape or incest.


Democrats see the statutes as a way to weave a broader message about Republicans.


“You use it as an example of what they do when they’re unchecked,” said Rep. A. Donald McEachin, D-Va., a leader of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, House Democrats’ campaign organization. “I think it drives moderate Republicans away from their party.”


Democratic presidential contenders are competing to lambast the Alabama law, which allows exceptions when the mother’s health is endangered. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., called it an “existential threat to the human rights of women,” while former Vice President Joe Biden said GOP hopes of striking down Roe v. Wade are “pernicious and we have to stop it.”


Campaign Facebook and Twitter accounts of Democrats seeking reelection next year, such as Sens. Doug Jones of Alabama and Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, are littered with posts attacking the harsh restrictions. “The people of Alabama deserve to be on the #rightsideofhistory — not the side of extremists,” Jones tweeted.


Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi and Ohio have enacted or neared approval of measures barring abortion once there’s a detectable fetal heartbeat, which can occur in the sixth week of pregnancy, before a woman may know she is pregnant. Missouri lawmakers approved an eight-week ban.


The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that of the 638,000 abortions it tallied in 2015, almost two-thirds were performed within the first eight weeks of pregnancy. About 1% were performed during or after the 21st week.


Spotlighting the perilous political territory Republicans are navigating, an April poll by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation found that Americans support Roe v. Wade by 2-1. A Gallup poll last year found that 57% of adults who described themselves “pro-life” nonetheless said abortion should be legal if the pregnancy results from rape or incest.


The focus on the state measures has also stolen GOP momentum on abortion. Until now, congressional Republicans had spent much of this year forcing Democrats onto the defensive, goading them into blocking bills aimed at curbing the rare abortions performed late in pregnancies and misleadingly accusing them of supporting infanticide.


“Obviously, the attention has shifted,” said Sarah Chamberlain, president of the Republican Main Street Partnership, which represents dozens of moderate GOP lawmakers. She said while her group doesn’t think Democrats’ focus on the harsh laws has gained traction, “We are talking about that and how it’s going to play in our districts.”


Some Republicans say the Democratic drive will have minimal impact because the abortion issue drives relatively few voters from each party. Others say GOP candidates should accuse Democrats of extremism by opposing bills restricting abortions late in pregnancy and, if they wish, cite their support for exempting rape and incest victims.


Democrats have “never seen an abortion they don’t like,” said David O’Steen, executive director of the National Right to Life Committee.


Added Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., who heads the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the Senate GOP campaign arm: “We’re not Alabama state representatives, we’re United States senators. And each of us has to make our positions known.”


Yet the laws have generated energy among abortion-rights groups, which held more than 500 demonstrations and other events this past week. “We will power this movement into 2020. There will be political consequences,” said Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America.


Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., distanced themselves early last week from the Alabama statute. They were joined Wednesday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who told The Associated Press, “My position remains unchanged for 25 years. I’m opposed to abortion except in cases of rape, incest and the life of the mother” being in jeopardy.


Associated Press writers Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Elana Schor contributed to this report.





Source: State abortion bans may hand Democrats a political weapon

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

5
Reader Pick: “Death of Celilo Falls” shows ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances

For thousands of years, Pacific Northwest Indians fished, bartered, socialized, and honored their ancestors at Celilo Falls, part of a nine-mile stretch of the Long Narrows on the Columbia River.

For thousands of years, Pacific Northwest Indians fished, bartered, socialized, and honored their ancestors at Celilo Falls, part of a nine-mile stretch of the Long Narrows on the Columbia River.


Death of Celilo Falls (University of Washington Press)

Although the Indian community of Celilo Village survives to this day as Oregon’s oldest continuously inhabited town, with the construction of The Dalles Dam in 1957, traditional uses of the river were catastrophically interrupted.


Most non-Indians celebrated the new generation of hydroelectricity and the easy navigability of the river “highway” created by the dam, but Indians lost a sustaining center to their lives when Celilo Falls was inundated.


Death of Celilo Falls is a story of ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances, as neighboring communities went through tremendous economic, environmental, and cultural change in a brief period.


Katrine Barber examines the negotiations and controversies that took place during the planning and construction of the dam and the profound impact the project had on both the Indian community of Celilo Village and the non-Indian town of The Dalles, intertwined with local concerns that affected the entire American West: treaty rights, federal Indian policy, environmental transformation of rivers, and the idea of “progress.”


Geoffrey Bateman of Denver is an associate dean and associate professor at Regis University.






Source: Reader Pick: “Death of Celilo Falls” shows ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

6
The Sink in Boulder to have liquor license suspended for over-serving man who later died in crash

The Sink on University Hill will have its liquor license suspended for at least eight days after Boulder’s Beverage Licensing Authority ruled the restaurant over-served a man who died in a fiery crash less than an hour after leaving the restaurant.

The Sink on University Hill will have its liquor license suspended for at least eight days after Boulder’s Beverage Licensing Authority ruled the restaurant over-served a man who died in a fiery crash less than an hour after leaving the restaurant.


The suspension was handed down following a hearing on May 15, with the Beverage Licensing Authority ruling The Sink violated conduct of establishment regulations in serving Michael McHugh, 21, who died on Aug. 16 in a crash. Per the stipulated agreement, the restaurant was given a 14-day liquor license suspension but will not be fined.


The restaurant will serve eight days of the suspension from May 31 to June 7. The Sink will only need to serve the remaining six days of the suspension if the restaurant has another violation within a year.


“As it has for the last 20 years, The Sink remains committed to participating in our community dialog and efforts to address the adverse impacts of alcohol consumption,” owner Mark Heinritz said in a statement. “While we do not agree with the findings of the (Beverage Licensing Authority), we do respect their decision. We feel terribly for the family and any role The Sink may have played in this tragedy. We offer the McHugh family our deepest sympathies during this difficult time.”


McHugh died after crashing his pickup truck into a traffic light pole at the corner of 30th Street and Colorado Avenue at 11:22 p.m on Aug. 16, 2018.


Jeremy Papasso, Daily Camera
University of Colorado senior Taylor Lawrence walks past The Sink as she walks to class on Jan. 26, 2018, on University Hill in Boulder.

According to a police report, McHugh went for drinks with two friends at The Sink, 1165 13th St., at about 10 p.m. on Aug. 16, but had not been drinking beforehand except for a mixed drink at 3 p.m. The group was there for about 40 minutes at the bar, with McHugh being served five drinks by one bartender, identified in documents as Jordan Rose.


While one of McHugh’s friends thought some of McHugh’s drinks were double shots of tequila and his receipt shows the purchase of three double shots, video evidence and other statements led the city to conclude McHugh had consumed about 6.25 ounces of 80 proof tequila, which is the equivalent of five single pours.


After leaving The Sink, one of McHugh’s friends told police he tried to take McHugh’s keys, but said McHugh refused. The group then went to the Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road,with McHugh driving in his truck and his friends following on a motorcycle.


The friend driving the motorcycle said it did not appear McHugh was weaving, though he said he did appear to be driving faster than normal.


Once at the Dark Horse, a doorman refused to let McHugh and his female friend into the bar because they were intoxicated.


The doorman told police the woman McHugh was with was the more intoxicated of the two, but he said he could tell McHugh had been drinking, noting he appeared to lean against a wall for balance and was “overly friendly.”


McHugh left the Dark Horse just after 11 p.m., with one friend telling police McHugh told them he wanted to get food from a nearby drive-thru. The crash was reported about 20 minutes later.


According to an autopsy report by Dr. Daniel Lingamfelter, McHugh died due to blunt force neck trauma, and the manner of death was ruled an accident. A toxicology test done from McHugh’s heart blood showed his blood alcohol level was .276, with Lingamfelter writing in the report that McHugh, who weighs 136 pounds, had a “severely elevated blood alcohol level.”


The toxicology test also found traces of THC and amphetamine in McHugh’s system.


In documents submitted to the Beverage Licensing Authority, a five-member board, some experts retained by The Sink disputed the blood alcohol level findings by the coroner.



“We dispute a central fact in this case — that Mr. McHugh’s BAC was .276,” The Sink’s attorney Mike Laszlo said in a statement. “First of all, that BAC level is not supported by the consumption of only 6.25 ounces of alcohol, which is the amount the city admits was served to Mr. McHugh. Second, the toxicologist expert testified that the BAC of .276 calculated by the coroner is inaccurate because the blood sample was from the heart blood, which is unreliable for testing BAC.”


Laszlo added the amount McHugh was served did not rise to the level of over-serving.


“The evidence shows there was no violation,” Laszlo said. “The Sink served only 6.25 ounces during the 40 minutes he was there, which is a typical amount that you’d be served in restaurants and bars around town.”


During the hearing, board members also acknowledged McHugh did not show any signs of intoxication but added that serving him the five drinks in less than an hour was, “at minimum, poor judgement.”


Rose chose not speak to police, according to the report.


According to documents filed with the Beverage Licensing Authority, The Sink has moved up its closing time from 2 a.m. to 11 p.m. and also will add time stamps on drink orders and put checks in front of customers to better monitor drink consumption.





Source: The Sink in Boulder to have liquor license suspended for over-serving man who later died in crash

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

7
Infant allegedly killed by his mother in Denver is identified

The name of an infant, allegedly killed by his mother, was released Friday by the Denver Office of the Medical Examiner.
Denver Police
Cintrease Dailey

The name of an infant, allegedly killed by his mother, was released Friday by the Denver medical examiner’s office.



Messiah Dailey was taken Tuesday to Rose Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead, according to the coroner’s office.


The cause of the 7-month-old boy’s death is pending further investigation, the coroner’s office said in a news release.


His mother, Cintrease Dailey, 31, was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of child abuse resulting in death.





Source: Infant allegedly killed by his mother in Denver is identified

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

8
Denver Zoo mandrill troop welcomes first baby in more than two decades; birth adds to vulnerable species

The Denver Zoo announced Friday that a baby monkey named Kesi can now be seen in the mandrill habitat.

Three days before Mother’s Day, the Denver Zoo welcomed a baby mandrill into its primate troop — the first such birth since the zoo’s “mandrill baby boom” in 2003.


Kesi was born May 10 and made her public debut Friday, according to a Denver Zoo news release. Kesi is her parent’s first baby and an important addition to a species that is listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.


Mandrills are a primate native to the rainforests in central West Africa. They have bright blue and red faces and can store almost an entire stomach’s worth of food in their cheek pouches. The species is the largest of all monkeys. The most well-known mandrill is the character Rafiki in “The Lion King.”



Two decades ago, the Denver Zoo experienced a “mandrill baby boom,” according to the zoo. Then, the zoo’s primates stopped procreating.


Kesi’s mother, Kumani, arrived at the zoo last year as part of a plan by U.S. zoos to help threatened species survive. Kumani became pregnant at the end of 2018.



For the best chance to catch Kesi and the rest of the troop, visitors should come to the zoo in the early morning or around lunchtime, according a zoo news release about the birth.





Source: Denver Zoo mandrill troop welcomes first baby in more than two decades; birth adds to vulnerable species

Colorado Chat Rooms - USA Chat Club

9
Denver weather: Mostly sunny Memorial Day weekend with snow in the mountains

A weather warm up in the Denver metro area comes just in time for Memorial Day weekend vacationers and travelers, with mostly sunny skies and only an occasional rain shower.

A weather warm up in the Denver metro area comes just in time for Memorial Day weekend travelers, with mostly sunny skies and only an occasional rain shower.


Temperatures will rise into the 70s from Friday through Monday, according to the National Weather Service in Boulder.


The high temperature on Friday will be around 70 degrees. The low will be about 40 degrees, the weather service says.





Snow showers are possible in the northern mountains of Colorado, forecasters say.




The weekend will be even warmer with highs of 74 degrees on Saturday and 79 on Sunday, forecasters say. There’s a 10 percent chance of rain showers on Saturday night.


The high will be around 70 degrees on Memorial Day, when there is a chance for scattered afternoon showers and thunderstorms, the NWS says.


Tuesday could be much wetter along the Front Range, with rain showers and thunderstorms forecast. The high temperature will only be about 53 degrees.


In the middle of next week temperatures will gradually get warmer with highs of around 66 degrees on Wednesday and 73 degrees on Thursday.






Source: Denver weather: Mostly sunny Memorial Day weekend with snow in the mountains

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10
Asteroid with own moon making pass within 3.2 million miles of Earth

An oddly-shaped asteroid, about a mile wide and with its own orbiting moon, will make a relatively close -- 3,219,955 miles -- pass of earth on Saturday, but viewing the celestial event with the naked eye will not be possible.
via NASA
A NASA rendering of 1999 KW4 asteroid with moon following.

An oddly shaped asteroid, about a mile wide and with its own orbiting moon, will make a relatively close — 3,219,955 miles — pass of Earth on Saturday, but viewing the celestial event with the naked eye will not be possible.


Professional and amateur astronomers may, however, catch a glimpse of asteroid 1999 KW4 with the use of powerful telescopes and lenses.


During the Saturday approach the asteroid will be a “very safe” distance from our planet, about 13.5 times the distance of the Earth and its moon, according to reporting by Eddie Irizarry, a NASA solar system ambassador, on EarthSky.org.


An Aten type – or Earth-crossing – space rock, the asteroid’s orbit brings it between the orbits of Venus and Earth, according to Irizarry. It completes an orbit around the sun once every 188 days.


The asteroid has an oblate shape with an equatorial ridge, making it look a bit like a cosmic cupcake. The smaller secondary asteroid — 1999 KW4’s moon — orbits the bigger rock about every 16 hours at a distance of about 1.6 miles, according to observations.



Discovered by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research astronomical survey in Socorro, N.M., in 1999, its next close encounter with Earth, after this pass, will be on May 25, 2036, according to Irizarry. The asteroid’s travel is well-documented, and its closest approach is more than five Earth-moon distances.


Although the pass won’t be visible to the naked eye, it’s still exciting and noteworthy, said Jennifer Hoffman, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Denver.


“This is a very small object, and it’s going to be very far away,” Hoffman said. “It’s cool because it reminds us that we’re in the neighborhood of other planets and asteroids and space junk.”


The passing will not be of any threat or danger to Earth, Hoffman said. “It’s just a space rock, a mile across and 13 times farther away than the moon.”





Source: Asteroid with own moon making pass within 3.2 million miles of Earth

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11
Kiszla: To settle salary dispute, Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. first must accept the No Fly Zone is dead

Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. isn’t going to like reading this obituary any more than he appreciates the salary Denver is paying him.

Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. isn’t going to like reading this obituary any more than he appreciates the salary Denver is paying him.


The No Fly Zone is dead. And it ain’t coming back.


Hate to break it to Harris, but the evolution of Denver’s defense appears to be yet another reason why the veteran cornerback miscalculated by pressing football operations chief John Elway to give him a huge raise to $15 million per year.


Under the direction of new coach Vic Fangio, the concepts of how the Broncos will defend the pass have changed, whether Harris is in a Denver uniform or not.


This team has lost some of the macho “real men play man” swagger in the secondary that was the No Fly Zone’s calling card. Since winning Super Bowl 50, however, the big personalities in Denver’s defensive backfield couldn’t always back up their braggadocio with shutdown pass coverage. The Broncos’ secondary became a field of orange poppies where tight ends skipped carefree.


Don’t tell Harris, but under Fangio, the Broncos will actually play some – gasp! – zone.


I asked safety Justin Simmons to explain how the defensive philosophy has changed from the time he walked into town as a rookie in 2016.


“The defense that we were previously … prided themselves on that (man-to-man) mentality. Just playing straight-up, smash-mouth football,” Simmons said. “By the time the route is open, our pass-rushers are getting to you, and vice versa. It was a great concept to be part of. I loved every minute of it.”


That was the No Fly Zone. RIP. This is now: The Broncos won’t be afraid to play man coverage, but they won’t die on that hill. The Fangio defense will give everyone a chance to be the hero.


“There are a lot of man concepts and a lot of zone concepts,” Simmons explained. “I think the biggest thing is you never know what is coming. It’s always mix and match. We’re always moving around. We try to make it as tough as possible on everybody.”


Just as the Broncos needed to wrest control of the offense from quarterback Peyton Manning to win the Super Bowl, the team now must evolve from the defensive schemes that made Harris great. And Harris is Pro Bowl awesome, but he’s no Champ Bailey. Elway would be foolish to make Harris the league’s top-paid cornerback.


While Harris regards anything less than fawning praise as a slight, everybody loves Harris, including me. Any NFL defense, including the unit being reshaped by Fangio, can pack more punch with Harris in the lineup.


To a man, teammates want Harris to get paid and get his booty back in the locker room. Linebacker Von Miller, however, might have said it best: “He’s a top DB in the league. You want to take care of guys like that. But it’s not all simple. It’s not all as simple as it seems.”


Stubbornly clinging to the past, Harris is guilty of Sears thinking in an Amazon world.


Even after the Broncos traded cornerback Aqib Talib to the Los Angeles Rams a year ago, Harris got agitated at the suggestion the No Fly Zone was dead. “It still exists. I started that.” Harris insisted at the time. “It’s not going (anywhere).”


Sorry, man. The No Fly Zone is not only grounded, it’s buried 6 feet under.


Hey, goodbyes are difficult for us all. The Super Bowl 50 rings will shine forever. But it’s time for the Broncos to let go of the past, change with the times and morph into a championship defense that’s the vision of Fangio rather than Wade Phillips.


At the risk of oversimplifying, look for the Broncos to rush the quarterback with four and cover in varied looks designed to confuse not only the QB in his pre-snap reads, but also offensive linemen trying to call out blocking assignments.



Yes, Harris wants his money. He’s willing to make a fuss, despite the fact nobody forced him to sign a contract that’s still valid at $7.9 million for the upcoming season. Here’s guessing even Elway respects the veteran cornerback’s stance, especially from an athlete who celebrates his 30th birthday next month.


So to soothe Harris’ ego and bolster Fangio’s defense, let’s bump his salary to $12.5 million, so he can feel good about walking into DB meetings as the highest-paid guy in the room this season. Then let him test his value on the open market in 2020.


If Harris cannot accept he won’t get top dollar in Denver, where things have changed, then maybe what he really needs is a change of scenery in a different NFL city.


 





Source: Kiszla: To settle salary dispute, Broncos cornerback Chris Harris Jr. first must accept the No Fly Zone is dead

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12
Colorado / Man dies hours after being booked into Colorado jail
« on: May 23, 2019, 04:37:37 PM »
Man dies hours after being booked into Colorado jail

CORTEZ, Colo. — Authorities say a man died hours after he was booked into a jail in southwestern Colorado. Montezuma County Sheriff Steve Nowlin told the Cortez Journal that jailers found 33-year-old Michael McMordie unresponsive and not breathing in his cell early Wednesday. Nowlin says CPR was performed, but McMordie could not be revived. He […]

CORTEZ, Colo. — Authorities say a man died hours after he was booked into a jail in southwestern Colorado.


Montezuma County Sheriff Steve Nowlin told the Cortez Journal that jailers found 33-year-old Michael McMordie unresponsive and not breathing in his cell early Wednesday.


Nowlin says CPR was performed, but McMordie could not be revived.


He says the death is under investigation, and an autopsy will be conducted.


Cortez Police Patrol Sgt. Rex Brinkerhoff says McMordie was arrested Tuesday on a warrant for failing to appear in court on a trespassing charge.


Nowlin says McMordie did not show signs of distress when he was booked into the county jail that evening.






Source: Man dies hours after being booked into Colorado jail

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13
Colorado / How a garden’s fragrance adds to its allure
« on: May 23, 2019, 10:09:25 AM »
How a garden’s fragrance adds to its allure

Recent rain and low temperatures temporarily dampened spring planting. Stay active with outdoor projects and more plant shopping. Take a moment to enjoy the many scents of the garden.
Betty Cahill, Special to The Denver Post
The hybrid tea rose “Elle” has a strong citrusy scent.

Recent rain and low temperatures temporarily dampened spring planting. Stay active with outdoor projects and more plant shopping. Take a moment to enjoy the many scents of the garden.


Ask any gardener what they consider the top benefits of gardening and they’ll most likely include the many pleasing plant aromas.


Why do we like good smells?


Often, we’re drawn to a plant’s scent and want to replicate a positive childhood memory like being near grandma and her old garden roses. The delicious foliage of herbs including basil, mint and lavender are not only easy to grow, but are scented powerhouses as well.


We smell in two different ways


Cells, or more specifically, the hair-like cilia organisms in the nose are responsible for triggering neurons to recognize volatile plant molecules. These neurons cue the brain to identify the scent. Many things like perfume, coffee and cut grass emit molecules the nose discerns. Chewing food also emits molecules that our throat picks up as smells.


Scented flowers from plants often take center stage, but don’t discount the subtle and often longer lasting fragrance from plant roots, stems, bark, seeds and leaves.


Our noses may enjoy the plethora of heady plant perfumes in the garden, yet plants use scent and other plant features like pollen, nectar, petal color and texture and light patterns to attract pollinators like bees, butterflies, moths and flies.


Not all plant fragrances are pleasant



The good news is that the worst offenders are less common in America. The infrequent indoor tropical blooming corpse flower is the best-known stinky plant that is described as smelling like rotten flesh. Hold your nose when a female ginkgo tree is shedding its messy fall fruit. You’ll be looking around for the origin of a pile of dirty gym socks. Ginkgo is still a wonderful, long-lived tree to consider, opt for a male cultivar instead.


If you’re a night owl gardener you’re in luck, many plants release their heavenly blooms and scents at night. Choices include annual Flowering Tobacco “Grandiflora”(Nicotiana alata), annual Moonflower (Ipomoea alba), annual Evening Stock (Matthiola bicornus), perennial white evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa), perennial “Casa Blanca” Oriental Lily and the tropical (container grown) cactus Cereus (Epiphyllum oxypetalum).


Consider the appeal of fragrant plants in your garden this summer. Many grow well in containers.




Fragrance in the Garden


The short list, based on plant type includes:


Annuals



  • Scented geraniums (not the annual zonal types) — simply rub one of their thick leaves to release their plant oils. Their flowers are pretty, yet small. There are dozens of aromas to choose from depending on variety—apple, apricot, citronella (not as effective as advertised to repel mosquitoes), lemon, rose, chocolate mint, strawberry, orange, peach and nutmeg

  • Heliotrope — making a welcome return in popularity in some garden centers, look for dark purple which has the strongest vanilla to cherry pie fragrance. Caution, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

  • More annuals — Verbena, sweet pea, sweet alyssum and marigold.


Shrubs, Trees, Perennials



  • Rose Shrubs — America’s National Floral Emblem may be the landscape winner for best fragrance. Scents range from mild to strong with notes of vanilla, spice, fruit and many variations of pleasing perfumes. Look for these: Hybrid Rugosa, “Blanc Double de Coubert,” an excellent white, repeating, medium sized shrub that forms attractive orange hips in fall. The hybrid tea rose “Elle” has a strong citrusy scent and repeat bloom with traditional full petals of pink shades and medium in size.

  • Shrubs — Very drought tolerant and behaved Cheyenne Mock Orange (Philadelphus lewisii “Cheyenne”) has pure white flowers that will be blooming soon with a sweet orange blossom fragrance. Lilacs are one of the most popular landscape plants and with good reasons — they are tough, long-lived, drought tolerant and oh so fragrant. Smaller cultivars (4 to 5 feet) to consider, which bloom in late May to early June are “Bloomerang Purple” (blooms again in late summer to fall), “Miss Kim’” and ‘”Tinkerbell.”  Several viburnum shrubs are fragrant, including Koreanspice, Burkwood, Mohawk and Judd.

  • Trees — Linden, Magnolia, Fringe Tree and Yellowwood, Seven Son Flower.

  • Perennials — Peony, Bee Balm, Dianthus, Daylily, Bearded Iris and Phlox.


Betty Cahill speaks and writes about gardening in Colorado. Visit her at gardenpunchlist.blogspot.com for more gardening tips.



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Source: How a garden’s fragrance adds to its allure

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14
Plan may send up to 10,000 troops to Mideast, U.S. officials say

The Pentagon on Thursday will present plans to the White House to send up to 10,000 more troops to the Middle East, in a move to beef up defenses against potential Iranian threats, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon on Thursday will present plans to the White House to send up to 10,000 more troops to the Middle East, in a move to beef up defenses against potential Iranian threats, U.S. officials said Wednesday.


The officials said no final decision has been made yet, and it’s not clear if the White House would approve sending all or just some of the requested forces. Officials said the move is not in response to any new threat from Iran, but is aimed at reinforcing security in the region. They said the troops would be defensive forces, and the discussions include additional Patriot missile batteries, more ships and increased efforts to monitor Iran.


The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the plans have not been formally announced.


Thursday morning’s meeting comes as tensions with Iran continue to simmer, and it wasn’t clear if a decision would be made during the session. Any move to deploy more forces to the Middle East would signal a shift for President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly emphasized the need to reduce America’s troop presence in the region.


U.S. officials have provided few details about possible Iranian threats, but indicated they initially involved missiles loaded onto small Iranian boats. This week officials said the missiles have been taken off the boats near Iran’s shore, but other maritime threats continue.


Sending more troops could also raise questions on Capitol Hill. During back-to-back closed briefings for the House and Senate on Tuesday, defense leaders told congressional officials the U.S. doesn’t want to go to war with Iran and wants to de-escalate the situation.


Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told lawmakers the U.S. is seeking to deter, not provoke, Iran, even while accusing Tehran of threatening U.S. interests in the Mideast. Shanahan told reporters, “Our biggest focus at this point is to prevent Iranian miscalculation.”


Many in Congress are skeptical of the administration’s approach to Iran, questioning whether it is responding to significant new Iranian threats or escalating a situation that could lead to war.


CNN first reported that the Pentagon will brief the White House on a plan that could send thousands of additional U.S. troops to the Middle East.


Air Force Col. Patrick Ryder, spokesman for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declined to comment, saying, “As a matter of long-standing policy, we are not going to discuss or speculate on potential or alleged future operations or plans.”


In early May, the U.S. accelerated the deployment of an aircraft carrier strike group to the Mideast and sent four B-52 bomber aircraft to the region. The Pentagon also decided to move a Patriot air-defense missile battery to an undisclosed country in the area.



The Trump administration has evacuated nonessential personnel from Iraq, amid unspecified threats the administration said are linked to Iranian-backed militias in the country.


On Sunday, a rocket was fired into Baghdad’s heavily fortified Green Zone, landing less than a mile from the sprawling U.S. Embassy. There were no injuries and no group claimed responsibility, but the rocket was believed to have been fired from east Baghdad — which is home to Iran-backed Shiite militias.


Some Democrats say Trump is responsible for drawing Iran’s ire. Last year he abruptly pulled the U.S. out of the Iran nuclear deal, negotiated during the Obama administration to prevent Iran from nuclear weapons production, without crafting a coherent strategy for how to combat other Iranian behavior like supporting extremist organizations. He also has reimposed punishing sanctions that have crippled Tehran’s economy, and designated Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps as a foreign terrorist organization in April.


“I have yet to see any exhibited strategy,” said Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger of Virginia, a former CIA officer. She said she finds many of the administration’s recent statements on Iran to be “deeply troubling.”





Source: Plan may send up to 10,000 troops to Mideast, U.S. officials say

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15
Long-running Colonial golf tournament back on solid footing with new sponsor

Colonial Country Club is the longest-running host of a PGA Tour event played on its original site, a fact that seemed in jeopardy not too long ago.

FORT WORTH, Texas — Colonial Country Club is the longest-running host of a PGA Tour event played on its original site, a fact that seemed in jeopardy not too long ago.


Local companies backed the tournament last year when it was called the Fort Worth Invitational following an upscale grocer’s withdrawal as title sponsor two years into a six-year contract.


Now the event that was first played at Hogan’s Alley in 1946 is on solid footing again as the Charles Schwab Challenge. The tournament starts Thursday.


“Been here since 1946. Been in essentially the same spot in our schedule. Been a lot of change in our schedule. This hasn’t changed. I don’t see it changing,” PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said Wednesday at Colonial. “It’s the history, the tradition, the passionate fan base, the success we’ve had, the impact we’ve had. We’ll do everything we can to make certain these events are here.”


The Dallas-Fort Worth tour stops, the Byron Nelson and Colonial, were split up this year with the PGA Championship’s move up to May from late summer. The Nelson two weeks ago was played at Trinity Forest Golf Club for the second time after moving from the TPC Four Seasons.


Nine of the world’s top 20 players are at Colonial, topped by third-ranked Justin Rose, the defending champion .


While PGA Championship winner Brooks Koepka and runner-up Dustin Johnson, the top two players, are taking a week off, five of the top 10 are in North Texas. Koepka, who at 17 under was the 2018 Colonial runner-up three strokes behind Rose, was one of only two top-20 players at the Nelson two weeks ago.


Financial services provider Charles Schwab & Co. was already deeply involved in golf when it became title sponsor at Colonial, where Hall of Famer and Fort Worth native Ben Hogan was a club member and won the inaugural PGA Tour event for first of his five wins on his home course.


Charles Schwab has a four-year agreement through 2022 with an option to add to that.


“We love being here in Fort Worth,” Monahan said. “We love the support we get. And knowing that this is a brand that’s all about elevation and about innovation and challenging, it’s a perfect time to come in. This event has a great future, and we know you’re going to push it along with us to new heights in the years ahead.”


On the PGA Tour Champions, for players over 50, the Charles Schwab Cup is awarded to the season’s top player. The company on Wednesday made a $5 million donation to the First Tee program to help the organization expand its programs and deepen its impact on young people in Texas.


After Dean and Deluca reneged on a title sponsorship after two years, local companies such as American Airlines, AT&T, XTO Energy and Burlington Northern Santa Fe railway supported Colonial Country Club in putting on the tournament last year.


Jordan Spieth, winless since the 2017 British Open, is coming off his first top-20 finish of the season when he tied for third last week at the PGA.



While Spieth played his first tour event as a 16-year-old amateur at the Nelson in 2010, the Dallas-born player also considers Colonial a hometown tournament. Spieth won the 2016 Colonial.


Ryan Palmer is playing on his home course, the one where caddie James Edmondson has won multiple club championships. Palmer’s only PGA Tour victory since 2010 came in the two-man team event with Jon Rahm, though his four top-10 finishes in 14 starts this season are already his most since 2015.


At Colonial, Palmer missed the cut last year, after finishing tied for 70th in 2017, a year after his Colonial-best finish of third. He has missed the cut four times at Hogan’s Alley, and has an average finish of 33rd in his other 11 appearances, including three top 10s.


“It’s hard at times because the pressure I put on myself and you want to play so well, and so many of my friends and family are here at Colonial Country Club,” Palmer said. “James and I both play regularly. I guess this is our fifth major.”





Source: Long-running Colonial golf tournament back on solid footing with new sponsor

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