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Topics - Iowa

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1
Presidential Candidate Amy Klobuchar Talks Immigration Policy in Oskaloosa

OSKALOOSA, Iowa — Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar discussed immigration policy while campaigning in Oskaloosa Tuesday. Klobuchar said the humanitarian crisis must be addressed. But she said nothing will be done until America sees the immigration issue as an economic crisis. “We don’t have workers in our fields and in our factories and our nursing homes and our hospitals. We have situations where we have people who study in medical schools and they do really, really well and they want to […]

OSKALOOSA, Iowa -- Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar discussed immigration policy while campaigning in Oskaloosa Tuesday.


Klobuchar said the humanitarian crisis must be addressed. But she said nothing will be done until America sees the immigration issue as an economic crisis.


"We don't have workers in our fields and in our factories and our nursing homes and our hospitals. We have situations where we have people who study in medical schools and they do really, really well and they want to stay in America, but we force them back to their home country,” said Klobuchar.


Klobuchar spent nearly an hour meeting with Iowans at Smokey Row in Oskaloosa. She says the immigration problems in the U.S. are too big to be boiled down to one topic or one border. She points to programs she helped start in her home state of Minnesota that extend visas for immigrants who take jobs in careers and locations of need.


Klobuchar said the most important thing for America in the 2020 election is to choose a leader they don't have to be ashamed of.


“You want to have someone who governs with integrity so that teachers who are here today can talk to their kids and say 'this is a president.' You may not always agree with the president, but this is what the president said today. This is what happened today. Time and time again, you have to wake up in the morning and read one of his mean tweets and read of these things where he has gone after people of color or gone after immigrants or gone after people in his own party because they don't agree with him,” said Klobuchar.


Klobuchar will attend the West Des Moines Democrats picnic at Legion Park on Wednesday.



Source: Presidential Candidate Amy Klobuchar Talks Immigration Policy in Oskaloosa

2
Iowa / Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies at 99
« on: July 17, 2019, 06:27:21 PM »
Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies at 99

Justice John Paul Stevens, who was nominated to the Supreme Court by Republican President Gerald Ford in 1975 in the wake of Watergate and stepped down almost 35 years later as a leader for the liberal side of the bench, has died. He was 99. Stevens, known as a soft spoken Midwesterner with a searing intellect, died on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Supreme Court. Stevens was born in the South Side of Chicago in 1920 and graduated from […]

Justice John Paul Stevens, who was nominated to the Supreme Court by Republican President Gerald Ford in 1975 in the wake of Watergate and stepped down almost 35 years later as a leader for the liberal side of the bench, has died. He was 99.


Stevens, known as a soft spoken Midwesterner with a searing intellect, died on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Supreme Court.


Stevens was born in the South Side of Chicago in 1920 and graduated from the University of Chicago in 1941, and Northwestern Law School in 1947. In interviews, he shied away from questions concerning his legacy and always maintained that his ideology hadn’t shifted during his years on the court.


On the bench, always with his trademark bow tie peaking over his judicial robes, Stevens would often wait until the latter half of an argument, lean forward with a polite, “May I ask” and then launch a razor sharp question cutting to the core of an advocate’s case.


He retired in 2010 at 90 years old, clearing the way for President Barack Obama to nominate Justice Elena Kagan, then 50, to take his place.


This story is breaking and being updated.


Source: Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies at 99

3
Iowa / New Poll Shows Kamala Harris is Surging in Iowa
« on: July 17, 2019, 10:20:27 AM »
New Poll Shows Kamala Harris is Surging in Iowa

IOWA — California Senator Kamala Harris is surging both nationally and in Iowa, according to two new polls released Tuesday. Former Vice President Joe Biden still leads the Democratic field in the early caucus state in a poll taken after last week’s debates from Suffolk University and USA Today, with 24% support. But Biden is followed by Harris (16%) and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren (13%). In a CNN/Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa poll conducted in early June, Biden was also at 24% support among […]

IOWA -- California Senator Kamala Harris is surging both nationally and in Iowa, according to two new polls released Tuesday.


Former Vice President Joe Biden still leads the Democratic field in the early caucus state in a poll taken after last week's debates from Suffolk University and USA Today, with 24% support. But Biden is followed by Harris (16%) and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren (13%).


In a CNN/Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa poll conducted in early June, Biden was also at 24% support among likely caucusgoers, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders at 16%, Warren at 15%, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg at 14%, and Harris at 7%. CNN on Tuesday released a national poll conducted with SSRS finding Harris increasing in her share of the vote, while Biden loses support.


But Suffolk's new poll suggests a decrease in support for Sanders and Buttigieg, at 9% and 6%, respectively. These differences could be because the polls weren't conducted by the same pollster and sponsor, but it's more likely that Harris is experiencing a bump in support after her performance in last week's debates, while Buttigieg and Sanders saw slight decreases.


And Quinnipiac's new national poll reflects that bump for Harris, with an increase from 7% in its early June poll to 20% support after the debates. Unlike in Iowa, Biden lost support nationally, down from 30% to 22%. Sanders also decreased slightly (from 19% to 13%), while Warren held steady.


Among those likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa who watched both nights of the debate, half said Harris did "better than expected," followed by former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro (29%) and Buttigieg (22%).


On the other side, those who watched both nights said Biden did "worse than expected" (41%), as did Sanders (23%), and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke (16%).


Among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents nationally, 47% said Harris did the best job in the debates while 16% said author Marianne Williamson did the worst, followed by 15% for Biden, according to Quinnipiac.


These results don't necessarily reflect solid preferences among Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa, with 60% of likely Democratic attendees saying they might change their mind on who to vote for before the caucuses.


Those who didn't choose Biden as their first or second choice said it was because they didn't have enough information/hadn't made up their mind (15%) or because of his age (15%).


As other polls have found nationally, health care is the most important issue that would affect vote (29%) followed by climate change (18%). Similarly, when asked to rate the importance of a nominee's support for certain issues, taxing the very wealthy comes out on top (64% call it very important), followed by Medicare for all (57%). Fewer prioritized impeaching President Donald Trump (41% very important), free higher education (39%) or breaking up big tech companies (26%).


Three-in-five likely Democratic caucus participants said it was more important to nominate a candidate who can defeat Trump over someone who reflects their priorities (34% preferred a candidate who reflects their priorities), another finding similar to the national population.


Regardless of how they intend to vote, Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents nationally think Biden would be the best leader and has the best chance of beating Trump in the Quinnipiac poll. But the proportion who think Biden would be the best leader is down from 44% in April to 26% now.


When asked which candidate had the best policy ideas, Warren won out with 31%.


The USA Today/Suffolk University poll of likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa was conducted by telephone June 28 through July 1 among a random sample of 500 likely caucus participants. Results among the full sample have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.


The Quinnipiac University poll of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents was conducted by telephone June 28 through July 1 among a random sample of 554 registered voters. Results among the Democratic sample have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 5.0 percentage points.



Source: New Poll Shows Kamala Harris is Surging in Iowa

4
Iowa / $100 Million Lost Island Theme Park Planned for Waterloo
« on: July 17, 2019, 12:26:26 AM »
$100 Million Lost Island Theme Park Planned for Waterloo

WATERLOO, Iowa — An Iowa water park is getting ready for a major expansion. On Monday, owners of the popular Lost Island Water Park in Waterloo announced plans to build a $100 million theme park adjacent to their current attractions. State “rise” funds, city money and private investments will help fund the project. Construction is expected to begin within the next few weeks, with the park opening in 2022.

WATERLOO, Iowa — An Iowa water park is getting ready for a major expansion.


On Monday, owners of the popular Lost Island Water Park in Waterloo announced plans to build a $100 million theme park adjacent to their current attractions.


State “rise” funds, city money and private investments will help fund the project.


Construction is expected to begin within the next few weeks, with the park opening in 2022.


Source: $100 Million Lost Island Theme Park Planned for Waterloo

5
Carl Voss Announces Run for At-Large Des Moines City Council Seat

DES MOINES, Iowa — Another candidate announced he is running for the at-large city council seat in Des Moines. Carl Voss threw his hat in the race Monday. Voss has served as an interim council member in the past, but he says now is the time to join full time. Voss said he wants to address clean water, revitalizing neighborhoods, fixing potholes and the sewer system, and improving mental health in our youth. He says he is ready to walk […]

DES MOINES, Iowa — Another candidate announced he is running for the at-large city council seat in Des Moines. Carl Voss threw his hat in the race Monday.


Voss has served as an interim council member in the past, but he says now is the time to join full time.


Voss said he wants to address clean water, revitalizing neighborhoods, fixing potholes and the sewer system, and improving mental health in our youth. He says he is ready to walk neighborhoods to hear from the voters.


“I’ll listen carefully to the constituents, get back to people with their issues and be a part of the mix,” said Voss.


Marco Battaglia has also announced he is running for the at-large seat. The seat has been held by Chris Coleman for the past 20 years. Coleman has not yet said whether he will be running for re-election.


Election Day is November 5.



Source: Carl Voss Announces Run for At-Large Des Moines City Council Seat

6
Trump Takes 20 Steps into North Korea, Making History as First Sitting U.S. Leader to Enter Country

NORTH KOREA — President Donald Trump shook hands with Kim Jong Un on Sunday and took 20 steps into North Korea, making history as the first sitting US leader to set foot in the country. Trump crossed the low stone curb separating the North and South at 3:45 p.m. local time, making his way alongside a grinning Kim into a country that’s long been a global pariah for its nuclear ambitions and dismal record on human rights. The event, seemingly […]

NORTH KOREA — President Donald Trump shook hands with Kim Jong Un on Sunday and took 20 steps into North Korea, making history as the first sitting US leader to set foot in the country.


Trump crossed the low stone curb separating the North and South at 3:45 p.m. local time, making his way alongside a grinning Kim into a country that’s long been a global pariah for its nuclear ambitions and dismal record on human rights.


The event, seemingly spontaneous and broadcast live, took to a new level Trump’s showman instincts and view of diplomacy as a test of interpersonal skills. Afterward, Trump said he agreed with Kim to revive staff-level talks that had collapsed after their last summit in February.


The encounter at the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone — their third in person — came a day after Trump raised the prospect of a border handshake in a tweet and declared he’d have “no problem” stepping into North Korea.


“Would you like me to step across?” Trump asked Kim as they shook hands. “I am OK with it.”


While inside North Korean territory, Trump and Kim shook hands and patted each other’s backs before returning across the border to the South after about a minute.


“I never expected to meet you at this place,” Kim, who appeared overjoyed in the moment, told Trump through an interpreter.


Later, Trump said he was “proud to step over the line” and thanked Kim for the meeting. He invited him to the White House, though later acknowledged such a visit would likely not come soon.


The North Korean leader said he was surprised by Trump’s request to meet, and accepted the offer due to their “excellent relationship” and the significance of meeting at the border.


“I think meeting here, two countries that have a hostile past, we are showcasing to the world that we have a new present and we have a positive meeting going forward,” he said.


After the historic handshake, the two men met inside the Freedom House at the DMZ for just under an hour — a more substantial session than Trump previewed earlier when he said his encounter with Kim would amount to little more than a handshake.


The moment marks a milepost in the United States’ fraught history with North Korea, but what it means beyond a display of friendship wasn’t immediately clear.


The North Korean government praised Trump’s “historic” meeting and handshake with Kim as an “amazing event” in the country’s first acknowledgment of the talks at Panmunjom, North Korean state news agency KCNA reported Sunday.


Kim said that it was the “good personal relations with Trump that made such a dramatic meeting possible,” according to KCNA.


The North Korean government went on to explain how the “bold” decision by Kim and Trump created “an unprecedented trust between the two countries which had been antagonizing each other with deep rooted hostility,” KCNA reported.


There did not appear to be any new commitments made in Trump’s 50-minute meeting with Kim beyond an agreement to restart talks. And Trump himself said afterward he was in no rush to rid North Korea of its nuclear weapons.


Still, the meeting and historic border crossing have broken a stalemate in the talks that hasn’t broken since Trump walked out of his last meeting with Kim in Vietnam four months ago.


Trump said negotiating teams would begin meeting in a matter of weeks.


The US team will be led by the current US special representative for North Korea, Stephen Biegun, Trump said. Turning to Biegun, Trump wished him luck.


 


Confirmation came after back-and-forth

Trump arrived to the border zone about an hour after he confirmed he would meet with Kim, and used an observation platform to peer into the North.


Standing alongside his South Korean counterpart, he appeared somber as he listened to a US military official, who pointed at landmarks in the distance.


“It used to be very, very dangerous,” Trump said, citing his briefing. “After our first summit, the danger went away.”


Even with history in the air, Trump did not avoid criticizing the media, claiming he wasn’t given credit for improving relations with Pyongyang.


“When they say there’s been no difference, there’s been a tremendous difference,” he griped. “I say that for the press, they have no appreciation for what is being done, none.”


The meeting along the fenced and barbed wire-topped border came after a morning of back-and-forth over whether the brief greeting would transpire after Trump on Saturday issued a public invitation for a handshake.


On Sunday morning, Trump framed the question of whether he’d actually meet Kim as a matter of logistics, indicating both sides were sorting arrangements to make the handshake happen.


 


Such a meeting was once unthinkable

The prospect of a US president stepping over the world’s most heavily fortified border into North Korea would once be unthinkable. But it’s in keeping with Trump’s deeply personal style of diplomacy and his flair for orchestrating drama around those efforts.


Still, some diplomats even in Trump’s own administration were caught off guard when he tweeted the invitation for Kim to meet Saturday while attending the final day of the G20 summit.


Trump’s last meeting with Kim collapsed when the two sides could not agree on terms exchanging sanctions relief for relinquishing North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. And the two sides have made little progress since.


After Trump’s first summit with Kim, a year ago in Singapore, there appeared to be progress in thawing relations. North Korea released some imprisoned Americans and returned the remains of some soldiers who’d been killed in the Korean War.


For a period, North Korea also suspended its provocative missile tests. But in the past month they have resumed testing short range missiles, though have not yet conducted nuclear or intermediate- or long-range missile tests.


“I’m not sure what it is that President Trump is trying to accomplish, because while all this engagement has gone on, there has been no decline in the stockpile of North Korean nuclear weapons or missiles,” said Joseph Yun, a former US special representative for North Korea under Trump and now a CNN analyst.


Trump says he’s in no rush and claims to have already seen results — both enough, in his view, for another meeting.


“If you’re in a rush, you get yourself in trouble,” he said during a news conference with South Korean President Moon Jae-in before his DMZ visit on Sunday.


 


Other presidents have gone to the DMZ — without Kim

Sunday was not the first attempt Trump made to get to the DMZ, the heavily guarded stretch that has divided the Korean Peninsula for three-quarters of a century. He was foiled by weather last time around, in 2017. Always highly attuned to optics, Trump wasn’t likely to pass up the opportunity to stare into the North from the observation platform.


Other presidents have made the same journey — all peering into the North through binoculars — but none have actually met the despotic leaders who rule it.


Nor has any sitting US president stepped across into the North.



Source: Trump Takes 20 Steps into North Korea, Making History as First Sitting U.S. Leader to Enter Country

7
Iowa / 2 Injured in Crash Involving Semis, U-Haul on Interstate 80
« on: July 15, 2019, 10:02:10 PM »
2 Injured in Crash Involving Semis, U-Haul on Interstate 80

POWESHIEK COUNTY, Iowa — Two people were injured in a crash involving two semi trucks and a U-Haul truck on Interstate 80 Sunday evening. The crash happened just before 5 p.m. at the 191 milemarker near the Malcom exit on I-80 eastbound. The Iowa State Patrol said one of the semis caught fire as a result of the crash. According to the Iowa State Patrol, there were no fatalities but two people were injured. The severity of their injuries is […]

POWESHIEK COUNTY, Iowa -- Two people were injured in a crash involving two semi trucks and a U-Haul truck on Interstate 80 Sunday evening.


The crash happened just before 5 p.m. at the 191 milemarker near the Malcom exit on I-80 eastbound. The Iowa State Patrol said one of the semis caught fire as a result of the crash.


According to the Iowa State Patrol, there were no fatalities but two people were injured. The severity of their injuries is unknown.


At one point, a portion of the interstate was closed and traffic was backed up for seven to ten miles. The interstate has since reopened.


The cause of the crash is under investigation.


Source: 2 Injured in Crash Involving Semis, U-Haul on Interstate 80

8
Insiders 6/30/19: Reparations for Slave Descendants, Chuck Grassley Discusses Marijuana

DES MOINES, Iowa — Should the federal government in some way pay descendants of slaves several generations later to help make up for the financial disadvantage that endured because of slavery? Abena Imhotep, who ran for lieutenant governor as a Libertarian, joins Insiders to discuss the idea of reparations. Prakash Kopparapu is the chair of the Iowa Latino & Asian Coalition. The coalition has already hosted many of the Democratic presidential candidates in Iowa. The growing organization looks to expand […]

DES MOINES, Iowa — Should the federal government in some way pay descendants of slaves several generations later to help make up for the financial disadvantage that endured because of slavery?


Abena Imhotep, who ran for lieutenant governor as a Libertarian, joins Insiders to discuss the idea of reparations.



Prakash Kopparapu is the chair of the Iowa Latino & Asian Coalition. The coalition has already hosted many of the Democratic presidential candidates in Iowa. The growing organization looks to expand diversity in the political discussion and has a big decision to make.



From time to time, we like to get a peek inside the thought process of Iowans trying to pick a favorite candidate. A University of Iowa graduate student who wants to be a social worker and a Johnston man who supported Bernie Sanders last time shares how they're thinking about 2020.



See why Sen. Chuck Grassley thinks President Trump just made a big move that could help a lot of Iowans, and hear why Grassley isn't so thrilled with the state of Illinois.



On the Insiders Quick Six, Channel 13 political director Dave Price discusses what we learned from the first presidential debates.




Source: Insiders 6/30/19: Reparations for Slave Descendants, Chuck Grassley Discusses Marijuana

9
Iowa / What to Know About the ICE Raids Scheduled for This Weekend
« on: July 15, 2019, 05:16:30 AM »
What to Know About the ICE Raids Scheduled for This Weekend

UNITED STATES — Immigration and Customs Enforcement is scheduled to move forward with an operation targeting migrant families with court-ordered removals that had previously been called off by President Donald Trump, according to a US official. ICE, an agency within the Department of Homeland Security, is charged, in part, with deporting undocumented immigrants. A senior immigration official told CNN that the details of the ICE operation, currently slated to start on Sunday, will be largely the same as the one postponed […]

UNITED STATES — Immigration and Customs Enforcement is scheduled to move forward with an operation targeting migrant families with court-ordered removals that had previously been called off by President Donald Trump, according to a US official.


ICE, an agency within the Department of Homeland Security, is charged, in part, with deporting undocumented immigrants. A senior immigration official told CNN that the details of the ICE operation, currently slated to start on Sunday, will be largely the same as the one postponed last month.


The New York Times first reported on the upcoming raids, saying they are expected to take place in at least 10 cities. The raids will occur “over multiple days” and will include “collateral” deportations in which “authorities might detain immigrants who happened to be on the scene, even though they were not targets of the raids.”


 


Who is targeted and why


The migrant families expected to be targeted recently arrived to the US.


In February, ICE sent around 2,000 letters to families who already had received final orders of removal by judges in absentia, asking them to self-report to local ICE offices by March to comply with the orders.


The upcoming operation is expected to target approximately 2,000 people, according to a senior immigration official.


Last year, the Executive Office for Immigration Review, which oversees the nation’s immigration courts, announced that it had begun tracking family cases filed by the Department of Homeland Security in 10 immigration court locations and those cases are being expedited to try to process the families in under a year.


Then-acting ICE director Mark Morgan said last month that ICE had worked closely with the Justice Department on the family expedited docket and that the “results were very disappointing,” claiming that some families haven’t attended their immigration hearings.


 


Where the raids are expected to take place


The senior immigration official tells CNN that the operation is expected to target some 2,000 family members with court orders of removal and take place over several days in 10 cities across the nation — Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York and San Francisco.


The city of New Orleans said on Twitter that it confirmed with ICE that “immigration enforcement will be temporarily suspended through the weekend” in areas of Louisiana and Mississippi impacted by tropical storm Barry.


 


What happens to those who are arrested?


There are additional legal steps that migrants could take in the event that they’re arrested, therefore it’s unlikely that all those targeted would be immediately deported.


In some cases, for example, an individual may be ordered removed because he/she didn’t show up to their immigration court hearing. If the reason the individual didn’t appear is because they weren’t provided notice of the date, time and place of their immigration hearing, that individual could file a motion to reopen their case.


Others could file a motion to reopen if conditions have deteriorated in their home country since the date they were ordered deported.


 


Trump has so far deported fewer people than Obama


According to Immigration and Customs Enforcement statistics, 256,085 people were deported in fiscal year 2018, up from 226,119 removals in fiscal year 2017.


That’s still significantly less than the number of people deported during fiscal year 2012, when the Obama administration deported more than 400,000 people.


Staffing limitations and budget constraints generally limit how many people the US can detain and deport — and how quickly that process happens. While the Trump administration has said it still focuses on criminals, there was an uptick in the number of people arrested by ICE without criminal records. Crossing the border illegally is a misdemeanor.


In Trump’s first year, ICE arrested 109,000 criminals and 46,000 people without criminal records — a 171% increase in the number of non-criminal individuals arrested compared to 2016.


CNN first reported in May that the administration had been considering deporting migrant families with court-ordered removals in an attempt to “send a message” to smugglers, according to a senior administration official.


As part of the consideration, the administration had been looking at an operation rolled out in the late years of Obama’s presidency — and revived in Trump’s first year in office — that also targeted families.


In 2017, ICE apprehended 650 individuals during a four-day operation, dubbed Operation Border Guardian/Border Resolve, which targeted families and unaccompanied children. According to the agency, it was the second iteration of the operation which had also taken place at the start of 2016 following an uptick in families and unaccompanied children crossing the border illegally.


Similar to the upcoming ICE operation, all individuals had court-ordered removals.


Source: What to Know About the ICE Raids Scheduled for This Weekend

10
Off Heels of First Presidential Debate, John Delaney Visits Boone Democrats

BOONE, Iowa — Fresh of the first round of presidential debates, Democratic candidate John Delaney was in Boone Saturday afternoon. The former congressman from Maryland says after the first presidential debate, he learned he had to take advantage of every time he had the mic. “I had to fight for every minute I had out there because I don’t think the moderators were giving everyone a fair share, but that’s fine, I did it, and I made some really important […]

BOONE, Iowa -- Fresh of the first round of presidential debates, Democratic candidate John Delaney was in Boone Saturday afternoon.


The former congressman from Maryland says after the first presidential debate, he learned he had to take advantage of every time he had the mic.


“I had to fight for every minute I had out there because I don't think the moderators were giving everyone a fair share, but that's fine, I did it, and I made some really important points particularly around healthcare,” said Delaney.


At the Boone County Democrat’s picnic, Delaney says he wants to fashion himself as a moderate in this race. He wants to reject popular left-wing talking points like total student debt elimination and Medicare for All.


“I'm for universal healthcare. I have a plane to give every American healthcare as a basic human right. It's called ‘Better Care’. You get a basic plan for free, but you're allowed to choose private insurance if you want. Why do we have to be the party that's making private insurance illegal? 150 million Americans have private insurance. A lot of them really like it, including our seniors who have Medicare Advantage, which is private insurance, and they love it. It's crazy to run on taking that away from people,” said Delaney.


Some in the crowd still liked some of the left-leaning policy but admit they may not be realistic.


“I'm for a lot of those issues but I think they’re baby steps, and I think John Delaney is right about that [with] what we can get done,” said Dave Waters.


An undecided voter, Waters didn't mention Delaney as someone he felt stood out in the first debate but says it's not always about how they come across on TV. Waters says events like the picnic help to form a better picture of a candidate.


“There's a couple of candidates that I've heard speak that I didn't think really came well across, but then when you got to meet them straight up, they were very sincere people. They weren't just doing their political statement. They were talking to you about your problems and their problems,” he said.


Delaney will continue his campaign with a meet and greet tomorrow at the Hy-Vee in Newton on Sunday at 10 a.m.



Source: Off Heels of First Presidential Debate, John Delaney Visits Boone Democrats

11
First Case of West Nile Virus of 2019 Confirmed in Audubon County

AUDUBON COUNTY, Iowa  —  An Audubon County man has tested positive for West Nile Virus, the first case confirmed in an Iowan in 2019. The Iowa Department of Public Health says the man is an older adult.  He has since recovered from the virus. West Nile Virus is spread by mosquitoes in Iowa.  Last year 104 Iowans were diagnosed with the disease.  Nine Iowans died from it. The department wants to remind you that there are ways to reduce the risk of […]

AUDUBON COUNTY, Iowa  --  An Audubon County man has tested positive for West Nile Virus, the first case confirmed in an Iowan in 2019.


The Iowa Department of Public Health says the man is an older adult.  He has since recovered from the virus.


West Nile Virus is spread by mosquitoes in Iowa.  Last year 104 Iowans were diagnosed with the disease.  Nine Iowans died from it.


The department wants to remind you that there are ways to reduce the risk of catching West Nile Virus. Those safety measures include using insect repellent with DEET, avoiding outdoor activities between dusk and dawn and covering your arms, legs, and feet completely while outdoors.


 


Source: First Case of West Nile Virus of 2019 Confirmed in Audubon County

12
Presidential Candidate Marianne Williamson Hopes to Stir Up Politics With Love

GRIMES, Iowa — In some ways, Marianne Williamson’s name is beginning to emerge in a crowded field of Democrats. “We need a realignment. We need to right the ship, not only in terms of our policy but also in terms of values in our heart,” said Williamson. The author’s presidential run is already appealing to Judy Sebern Beachy of Des Moines.  “I understand her message of love as a force that can change politics,” said Sebern Beachy. It’s the way […]

GRIMES, Iowa -- In some ways, Marianne Williamson’s name is beginning to emerge in a crowded field of Democrats.


"We need a realignment. We need to right the ship, not only in terms of our policy but also in terms of values in our heart," said Williamson.


The author’s presidential run is already appealing to Judy Sebern Beachy of Des Moines.  "I understand her message of love as a force that can change politics," said Sebern Beachy.


It's the way Williamson explained her message on the Miami debate stage Thursday that is getting national attention.  That exposure has found its way on perhaps an even bigger stage, as SNL star Kate McKinnon impersonated Williamson on Late Night with Seth Meyers.


For Williamson, her presidential bid is no laughing matter.  "When I’m president of the United States, I will be concerned with the rights of every American," she said.


Speaking to a group of voters in Grimes Saturday, Williamson displayed her passion for a child’s right to a great education, no matter their family’s socioeconomic status.  "Where is the right of the child to secure happiness if they are trapped by the age of eight in conditions in life that make it so hard for them to self-actualize?"


That passion stood out for Brenna Tomlin of the Polk City Democrats. "I thought she was very charismatic," said Tomlin.  But Tomlin didn't hear enough yet to be convinced.  "It’s such a saturated field. It is incredibly hard to pick and choose one," Tomlin said.


While many voters weigh a candidate's experience in politics, Williamson sees her lack of political experience in a positive light.  "If people are just toeing the line saying 'no, it has to be one of us,' I just hope the American people will understand that there are many different kinds of expertise and many different kinds of qualifications."


It's qualifications that some of Williamson’s early supporters say will add life to the country.  Sebern Beachy said, "Politics have gotten stale and one track thinking, and we need outsider wisdom that will take us to a different level."



Source: Presidential Candidate Marianne Williamson Hopes to Stir Up Politics With Love

13
Jill Biden Visits Iowa; Supporters React to Joe Biden’s Debate Performance

DES MOINES, Iowa — The former vice president’s wife, Jill Biden, made a visit to the Hawkeye state for a meet and great with voters Friday night. Jill Biden was accompanied by her granddaughter, Natalie, who is the daughter of the Biden’s late son, Beau. Their visit comes the night after her husband went head to head with nine other candidates in the second Democratic debate in Miami on Thursday. Biden faced attacks from a younger rival, Sen. Kamala Harris […]

DES MOINES, Iowa -- The former vice president's wife, Jill Biden, made a visit to the Hawkeye state for a meet and great with voters Friday night.


Jill Biden was accompanied by her granddaughter, Natalie, who is the daughter of the Biden's late son, Beau.


Their visit comes the night after her husband went head to head with nine other candidates in the second Democratic debate in Miami on Thursday.


Biden faced attacks from a younger rival, Sen. Kamala Harris throughout the night. Notably, the California senator called out Biden for a recent comment he made about his past work with two segregationist senators.


"It was hurtful to hear you talk about the reputations of two United States senators who built their reputations and career on segregation of race in this country," Harris said.


Biden defended himself at the debate and again in Chicago at a campaign event Friday morning.


"I respect Senator Harris but we all know that 30 seconds to 60 seconds on a campaign debate exchange can’t do justice to a lifetime committed to civil rights,” he said.


At Jill's meet and greet event in Des Moines, she briefly mentioned the debate but didn't speak about her husband's performance.


However, she reiterated to voters why she and her family felt it was important for Joe to seek the office of presidency.


"People were desperate to beat Trump," she said. "The cries got louder. 'He has to run. Joe has to run.'"


She also mentioned why he decided to not run for president in 2016, due to the loss of their son Beau, who died from cancer.


"Those of you here who have children know that if you lost a child, it's not like you ever move on from it," she said. "And to run for president in 2016, if you can't have your heart and your soul in it, you just can't do it."


Despite some national criticism that followed his performance in the debate, Biden's supporters at the event remained unfazed.


"Do I feel he was as strong? I think he was real," Kelly Donnelly said.


Another supporter, Gano Whetstone, said his responses exceeded her expectations.


"I thought he did a tremendous job defending himself on those attacks," she said.


Jill Biden and her granddaughter will visit three other cities on Saturday -- Ankeny, Boone and Ames. She and her husband will return to Iowa the following week for the Des Moines parade and other events.



Source: Jill Biden Visits Iowa; Supporters React to Joe Biden’s Debate Performance

14
Federal Judge Gives the Green Light for First Title IX Sexual Misconduct Case to Proceed to Trial

DES MOINES, Iowa— A male student referred to as “John Doe” claims Grinnell College violated Title IX. The federal law bans colleges from discriminating based on sex. Doe’s attorneys say a lawsuit like this is a first in the country. Doe filed the 42-page lawsuit after the school expelled him over claims of sexual misconduct. “He is coping. It’s not easy, it’s challenging,” Attorney David Goldman said. The misconduct claims stem from an encounter with a female student in July […]

DES MOINES, Iowa— A male student referred to as "John Doe" claims Grinnell College violated Title IX.


The federal law bans colleges from discriminating based on sex. Doe's attorneys say a lawsuit like this is a first in the country.


Doe filed the 42-page lawsuit after the school expelled him over claims of sexual misconduct.


“He is coping. It’s not easy, it's challenging," Attorney David Goldman said.


The misconduct claims stem from an encounter with a female student in July 2015. The alleged victim, referred to as "Jane Roe", reported it to the college in February of 2016.


“They were both naked consensual," Goldman said.


Doe's attorney says the college decided to launch an investigation, despite Roe's refusal to file a formal complaint.


The investigation ended with Doe's expulsion.


“The school promises their students that in matters of discipline they will be treated in a way that's fundamentally fair," Goldman said.


Now, three years later, Doe and his attorneys say he was not given a chance to defend himself, some of the evidence was ignored, and he was discriminated because he is a man.


“Could conclude that gender bias played a role in an erroneous decision being made and that is a violation of Title IX," Goldman said.


The college released a statement saying:


"All this decision means is that two claims may proceed to trial. Three others were dismissed and will not. There is no finding that the college violated Title IX.  And we look forward to sharing our robust processes that uphold the rights of all our students at trail. I hope you understand that since there is a pending trial, the college cannot comment further."


The trial is scheduled to begin in September.


Source: Federal Judge Gives the Green Light for First Title IX Sexual Misconduct Case to Proceed to Trial

15
Supreme Court to Decide Future of DACA Protections for Undocumented Immigrants

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Supreme Court said Friday it will review next term President Donald Trump’s decision to terminate an Obama-era program that protects hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children, setting up a potential decision in the heart of the 2020 presidential election. A decision siding with the administration could strip protections for nearly 700,000 so-called Dreamers. Immigration was a signature issue during Trump’s first presidential campaign and will be again in the […]

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Supreme Court said Friday it will review next term President Donald Trump’s decision to terminate an Obama-era program that protects hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children, setting up a potential decision in the heart of the 2020 presidential election.


A decision siding with the administration could strip protections for nearly 700,000 so-called Dreamers.


Immigration was a signature issue during Trump’s first presidential campaign and will be again in the upcoming election. Democratic presidential hopefuls showed this week that they also intend on seizing on the issue, as they pledged to extend protections in two days of debates — some the top candidates even said they would do so on their first day in office.


The justices have been considering whether to take up the case for months, while allowing renewals for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program to continue.


The program, which protects participants from deportation and allows them to work in the US, has become a focal point in the debate over Trump’s proposed US-Mexico border wall and efforts to crack down on immigration.


Trump has repeatedly cited the fact that lower courts blocked his effort to phase out DACA and the potential for a Supreme Court review as a reason not to make a deal with Democrats to extend the program on a comprehensive immigration bill. The President has felt all along that although lower courts ruled against him, he would ultimately prevail in the Supreme Court, much as the administration did in the final version of the travel ban.


Last year, for instance, Trump tweeted: “It just shows everyone how broken and unfair our Court System is when the opposing side in a case (such as DACA) always runs to the 9th Circuit and almost always wins before being reversed by higher courts.”


Many DACA recipients are unable to obtain legal status on their own because they were either brought into the country illegally or they overstayed their visas. That often precludes them from becoming a lawful permanent resident because one of the requirements is having entered — and resided in — the country legally.


Friday’s announcement was made without comment or any noted dissent.


 


Congressional action unlikely

The program was implemented by President Barack Obama after comprehensive immigration reform failed in Congress.


While legislation has been introduced to enshrine the protections into law, it faces an uphill battle, giving additional weight to the Supreme Court’s impending decision.


The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives passed a bill earlier this year that would provide a pathway to citizenship for more than 1 million undocumented immigrants, including DACA recipients, but it is highly unlikely to become law anytime soon, particularly ahead of a presidential election. Even if it were to pass the Republican-controlled Senate, it faces a certain veto from Trump.


The move shows the justices are willing to jump into the political fray, even as Chief Justice John Roberts this term has tried to keep the court out of partisan politics, said Steve Vladeck, CNN Supreme Court analyst and professor at the University of Texas School of Law.


“The court may be hoping that the political branches reach some kind of compromise solution in the interim, but today’s action suggests that they’re unwilling to defer to the political branches indefinitely.”


 


Legal history

The issue facing the Supreme Court is not the legality of the program, but the way the Trump administration wanted to terminate it.


In September 2017, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the phase-out of DACA, arguing that it was created “without proper statutory authority.” Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke then formally rescinded the program. Under the administration’s original plan, protections would have begun to expire in March 2018. But a slew of legal challenges and subsequent court rulings kept the program alive.


Plaintiffs, including the University of California, a handful of states and DACA recipients, argued that the phase-out violated the Administrative Procedure Act, a federal law that governs how agencies can establish regulations.


“DACA reflects our nation’s commitment to helping hardworking people and creates hope and opportunity for a new generation — many of whom were brought to our country as toddlers, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement Friday. “We look forward to making our case before the Supreme Court.”


Three federal judges have ruled that the justification and the manner by which the administration terminated DACA was flawed. The administration had tried to circumvent the appeals courts and involve the Supreme Court early on to no avail. But late last year, the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals eventually upheld a ruling blocking the phase out, allowing the Supreme Court appeal.


“To be clear: we do not hold that DACA could not be rescinded as an exercise of Executive Branch discretion,” wrote Appeals Court Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw. “We hold only that here, where the Executive did not make a discretionary choice to end DACA — but rather acted based on an erroneous view of what the law required — the rescission was arbitrary and capricious under settled law.”



Source: Supreme Court to Decide Future of DACA Protections for Undocumented Immigrants

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